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Artificial Artists Reading Answers: IELTS Reading Practice Test

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Updated on Jul 02, 2024, 11:57

 Welcome to the IELTS Reading Practice Test, which focuses on artificial artists! Artificial intelligence, including artists, is coming into the world today through technology. These artists are using computer programs to create their art, just like virtual painters. They change the way we think about art and creativity. 

 

You will learn more about these artificial artists and how they transform the art world through their computer-generated creations in this test. Together we'll explore and discover this intriguing subject.

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1. Artificial Artists Reading Passage

You should spend approximately 20 minutes answering Questions 1 - 14 based on the Reading Passage below. 

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2. Artificial Artists Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Artificial Artists.

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1.

Artificial Artists Reading Passage

The general Instructions for IELTS Reading are as follows:

  • You should read the instructions for each question carefully and answer according to them.
  • The reading passages will increase in difficulty as you progress through the test.
  • You should manage your time carefully to ensure enough time to answer all the questions.
  • You cannot bring any electronic devices, including mobile phones, into the test room.
  • You are advised to read the passages and questions thoroughly before answering them.

 

 

 

 

     Artificial Artists Reading Passage


 

        Can computers really create works of art?


 

Paragraph 1

The Painting Fool is one of a growing number of computer programs which, so their makers claim, possess creative talents. Classical music by an artificial composer has had audiences enraptured, and even tricked them into believing a human was behind the score. Artworks painted by a robot have sold for thousands of dollars and been hung in prestigious galleries. And software has been built which creates are that could not have been imagined by the programmer.
 

Paragraph 2

Human beings are the only species to perform sophisticated creative acts regularly. If we can break this process down into computer code, where does that leave human creativity? ‘This is a question at the very core of humanity,’ says Geraint Wiggins, a computational creativity researcher at Goldsmiths, University of London. ‘It scares a lot of people. They are worried that it is taking something special away from what it means to be human.’
 

Paragraph 3

To some extent, we are all familiar with computerised art. The question is: where does the work of the artists stop and the creativity of the computer begin? Consider one of the oldest machine artists, Aaron, a robot that has had paintings exhibited in London’s Tate Modern and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Aaron can pick up a paintbrush and paint on canvas on its own. Impressive perhaps, but it is still little more than a tool to realise the programmer’s own creative ideas.
 

Paragraph 4

Simon Colton, the designer of the Painting Fool, is keen to make sure his creation doesn’t attract the same criticism. Unlike earlier ‘artists’ such as Aaron, the Painting Fool only needs minimal direction and can come up with its own concepts by going online for material. The software runs its own web searches and trawls through social media sites. It is now beginning to display a kind of imagination too, creating pictures from scratch. One of its original works is a series of fuzzy landscapes depicting trees and sky. While some might say they have a mechanical look, Colton argues that such reactions arise from people’s double standards towards software-produced and human-produced art. After all, he says, consider that the Painting Fool painted the landscapes without referring to a photo. ‘If a child painted a new scene from its head, you’d say it has a certain level of imagination,’ he points out. ‘The same should be true of a machine.’ Software bugs can also lead to unexpected results. Some of the Painting Fool’s paintings of a chair came out in black and white, thanks to a technical glitch. This gives the work an eerie, ghostlike quality. Human artists like the renowned Ellsworth Kelly are lauded for limiting their colour palette – so why should computers be any different?
 

Paragraph 5

Researchers like Colton don’t believe it is right to measure machine creativity directly to that of humans who ‘have had millennia to develop our skills’. Others, though, are fascinated by the prospect that a computer might create something as original and subtle as our best artists. So far, only one has come close. Composer David Cope invented a program called Experiments in Musical Intelligence, or EMI. Not only did EMI create compositions in Cope’s style but also that of the most revered classical composers, including Bach, Chopin and Mozart. Audiences were moved to tears, and EMI even fooled classical music experts into thinking they were hearing genuine Bach. Not everyone was impressed, however. Some, such as Wiggins, have blasted Cope’s work as pseudoscience and condemned him for his deliberately vague explanation of how the software worked. Meanwhile, Douglas Hofstadter of Indiana University said EMI created replicas which still rely completely on the original artist's creative impulses. When audiences found out the truth, they were often outraged with Cope, and one music lover even tried to punch him. Amid such controversy, Cope destroyed EMI’s vital databases.
 

Paragraph 6

But why did so many people love the music, yet recoil when the discovered how it was composed? A study by computer scientist David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University provides a clue. He asked both expert musicians and non-experts to assess six compositions. The participants weren’t told beforehand whether the tunes were composed by humans or computers, but were asked to guess, and then rate how much they liked each one. People who thought the composer was a computer tended to dislike the piece more than those who believed it was human. This was true even among the experts, who might have been expected to be more objective in their analyses.
 

Paragraph 7

Where does this prejudice come from? Paul Bloom of Yale University has a suggestion: he reckons part of the pleasure we get from art stems from the creative process behind the work. This can give it an ‘irresistible essence’, says Bloom. Meanwhile, experiments by Justin Kruger of New York University have shown that people’s enjoyment of an artwork increases if they think more time and effort was needed to create it. Similarly, Colton thinks that when people experience art, they wonder what the artists might have been thinking or what the artist is trying to tell them. It seems obvious, therefore, that with computers producing art, this speculation is cut short – there’s nothing to explore. But as technology becomes increasingly complex, finding those greater depths in computer art could become possible. This is precisely why Colton asks the Painting Fool to tap into online social networks for its inspiration: hopefully this way it will choose themes that will already be meaningful to us.

2.

Artificial Artists Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Artificial Artists.

Questions and Answers 1-5
  • Choose the correct letter, A, B, C or D.
  • Write the correct letter in boxes 1-5 on your answer sheet.

 

1.   What is the writer suggesting about computer-produced works in the first paragraph?
 

  1. People’s acceptance of them can vary considerably.
  2. A great deal of progress has already been attained in this field.
  3. They have had more success in some artistic genres than in others.
  4. The advances are not as significant as the public believes them to be.


2.   According to Geraint Wiggins, why are many people worried by computer art?
 

  1. It is aesthetically inferior to human art.
  2. It may ultimately supersede human art.
  3. It undermines a fundamental human quality.
  4. It will lead to a deterioration in human ability.


3.   What is a key difference between Aaron and the Painting Fool?
 

  1. its programmer’s background
  2. public response to its work
  3. the source of its subject matter
  4. the technical standard of its output


4.   What point does Simon Colton make in the fourth paragraph?
 

  1. Software-produced art is often dismissed as childish and simplistic.
  2. The same concepts of creativity should not be applied to all forms of art.
  3. It is unreasonable to expect a machine to be as imaginative as a human being.
  4. People tend to judge computer art and human art according to different criteria.


5.   The writer refers to the paintings of a chair as an example of computer art which
 

  1. achieves a particularly striking effect.
  2. exhibits a certain level of genuine artistic skill.
  3. closely resembles that of a well-known artists.
  4. highlights the technical limitations of the software.


 

Artificial Artists Reading Answers with Explanations (1-5)


 

Type of question: Multiple Type Questions

 

This is the typical MCQ type. You just need to select one answer out of the 4 options.

 

How to best answer the questions 

 

  • Skim through the questions and identify the keywords
  • Use the elimination method and recognise options that include inaccurate or false information as per the given passage 
  • Match each option with the passage and choose an answer most accurately supported by the information in the passage. 
  • Cross-check your answers and finalise them

 

1. B

 

Reference 

From paragraph 1: “The Painting Fool is one of a growing number of computer programs which, so their makers claim, possess creative talents.”
 

Explanation

The Painting Fool is a computer program that can create its own art and some people claim that it's actually quite good. There are other examples of artificial intelligence being used to create music. It's pretty amazing how far technology has come.

 

2. C

 

Reference 

From paragraph 2: “If we can break this process down into computer code, where does that leave human creativity? ‘This is a question at the very core of humanity,’ says Geraint Wiggins, a computational creativity researcher at Goldsmiths, University of London.”
 

Explanation

The role of human creativity in the age of computer code is a topic of concern. Geraint Wiggins, a computational creativity researcher at Goldsmiths, University of London, believes this question is at the very core of humanity. While machines can assist with certain tasks, they cannot replace the unique perspective, emotions, and experiences that make human creativity so valuable. 
 

3. C

 

Reference 

From paragraph 4: “Unlike earlier ‘artists’ such as Aaron, the Painting Fool only needs minimal direction and can come up with its own concepts by going online for material. The software runs its own web searches and trawls through social media sites.”
 

Explanation

Unlike earlier software such as Aaron which required significant direction, the Painting Fool is capable of generating its own concepts by searching online for material. The software runs its own web searches and trawls through social media sites and is now even able to generate pictures from scratch. This marks an exciting development in the software's capabilities, as it begins to display a kind of imagination.
 

 

4. D

 

Reference 

From paragraph 4: “While some might say they have a mechanical look, Colton argues that such reactions arise from people’s double standards towards software-produced and human-produced art.”
 

Explanation

Colton suggests that people hold double standards towards software-produced and human-produced art. The Painting Fool's ability to create landscapes without referencing a photo challenges these beliefs. Colton encourages us to be more open-minded about software-generated art, recognising it as a legitimate form of creativity.


 

5. A

 

Reference 

From paragraph 4: “Some of the Painting Fool’s paintings of a chair came out in black and white, thanks to a technical glitch. This gives the work an eerie, ghostlike quality.”
 

Explanation

As per the paragraph, due to a technical glitch in some of the Painting Fool's paintings of a chair being in black and white, lending an eerie, ghostlike quality to the work. This raises the question: if human artists like the renowned Ellsworth Kelly are celebrated for their limited use of colour, why should computers be judged differently? The Painting Fool's black and white paintings demonstrate that software-generated art can produce unique and unexpected results that are just as valid as those produced by human artists.

Questions and Answers 6-11
  • Complete each sentence with the correct ending, A-G below.
  • Write the correct letter, A-G, in boxes 6-11 on your answer sheet.

 

6.   Simon Colton says it is important to consider the long-term view then

7.   David Cope’s EMI software surprised people by

8.   Geraint Wiggins criticized Cope for not

9.   Douglas Hofstadter claimed that EMI was

10.   Audiences who had listened to EMI’s music became angry after

11.   The participants in David Moffat’s study had to assess music without

 

List of Ideas
 

A     generating work that was virtually indistinguishable from that of humans.

B     knowing whether it was the work of humans or software.

C     producing work entirely dependent on the imagination of its creator.

D     comparing the artistic achievements of humans and computers.

E     revealing the technical details of his program.

F     persuading the public to appreciate computer art.

G    discovering that it was the product of a computer program


 

Artificial Artists Reading Answers with Explanations (6-11)

 

Type of question: Sentence Completion

 

In this task, you will be given a set of questions with missing information, typically sentences with blank spaces. You must complete each statement with one word or phrase (as instructed). 

 

How to best answer

 

  • Read the questions first to understand what information you need to look for in the passage.
  • Skim the passage and look for keywords 
  • You may have to look for synonyms or paraphrases to locate the answer 
  • Verify your answers and finalise them

 

6. D

 

Reference 

From paragraph 5: “Researchers like Colton don’t believe it is right to measure machine creativity directly to that of humans who ‘have had millennia to develop our skills’.”
 

Explanation

While some researchers, like Colton, don't believe in measuring machine creativity against humans, others are fascinated by the prospect of computers creating art as original and subtle as our best artists. However, only one machine has come close so far, highlighting the potential for further development in this area and the possibility of a future where machines and humans collaborate to create remarkable art.


 

7. A

 

Reference 

From paragraph 5: “So far, only one has come close. Composer David Cope invented a program called Experiments in Musical Intelligence, or EMI.”
 

Explanation

One machine that has come close to creating art as original and subtle as humans is Composer David Cope's Experiments in Musical Intelligence (EMI). This program can create compositions not only in Cope's style but also in the style of revered classical composers such as Bach, Chopin, and Mozart.


 

8. E

 

Reference 

From paragraph 5: “Some, such as Wiggins, have blasted Cope’s work as pseudoscience, and condemned him for his deliberately vague explanation of how the software worked.”
 

Explanation

David Cope's Experiments in Musical Intelligence has received criticism from some, such as Wiggins, who have called it pseudoscience and condemned Cope for his vague explanation of how the software works. Others, such as Douglas Hofstadter of Indiana University, have noted that EMI creates replicas that still rely entirely on the original artist's creative impulses.

 

9. C

 

Reference 

From paragraph 5: “Meanwhile, Douglas Hofstadter of Indiana University said EMI created replicas which still rely completely on the original artist's creative impulses.”
 

Explanation

Douglas Hofstadter of Indiana University notes that EMI's compositions rely on the original artist's creative impulses. However, when audiences discovered the truth, they were outraged with Cope, and one even tried to punch him. Despite the controversy, software-generated art pushes the boundaries of what is possible in creativity.


 

10. G

 

Reference 

From paragraph 5: “When audiences found out the truth they were often outraged with Cope, and one music lover even tried to punch him. Amid such controversy, Cope destroyed EMI’s vital databases.”
 

Explanation

The controversy surrounding EMI reached a boiling point when audiences discovered the truth and were outraged with Cope. In fact, one music lover even attempted to punch him. As a result, Cope destroyed EMI's vital databases. Despite this setback, the development of software-generated art continues to hold promise in the creative world.


 

11. B

 

Reference 

From paragraph 6: “A study by computer scientist David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University provides a clue.”
 

Explanation

Computer scientist David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University conducted a study that sheds light on the issue. He asked both expert musicians and non-experts to assess six compositions without informing them of the origins of the pieces.

Questions and Answers 12-14
Do the following statements agree with the claims of the writer in Reading Passage 3?
In boxes 12-14 on your answer sheet, write

  • YES if the statement agrees with the claims of the writer
  • NO if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer
  • NOT GIVEN if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

 

12   Moffat’s research may help explain people’s reactions to EMI.

13   The non-experts in Moffat’s study all responded in a predictable way.

14   Justin Kruger’s findings cast doubt on Paul Bloom’s theory about people’s prejudice towards computer art.


 

Artificial Artists Reading Answers with Explanations (12-14)

 

Type of question: Yes/No/Not Given

 

In this task, you are given a set of statements. Based on your understanding of the passage, you should identify the nature of the given statement and write the correct answer. 
 

You can assess whether the statement given in the question is:
 

YES               if the statement agrees with the information

NO              if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN    if there is no information on this
 

How to best answer the question
 

  • Read the given question statements carefully and note down the keywords
  • With the help of the keywords, locate them in the passage, which will help you decide whether the given statement is yes or no
  • Your answer will not be given if the information is not in the passage.

 

 

12. Yes

 

Reference 

From paragraph 6: “But why did so many people love the music, yet recoil when the discovered how it was composed? A study by computer scientist David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University provides a clue. He asked both expert musicians and non-experts to assess six compositions.”
 

Explanation

The answer is true because a study by computer scientist David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University provides a clue as to why people may love music created by software but then recoil when they discover its origins. Moffat asked both expert musicians and non-experts to assess six compositions without informing them of the pieces' origins.


 

13. Not Given

 

Reference 

From paragraphs 1 to 7: “The Painting Fool is one of a growing number of computer programs………hopefully this way it will choose themes that will already be meaningful to us.”
 

Explanation

The answer is not given because there is no context given regarding the response of non-experts in Moffat’s study in a predictable way.


 

14. No

 

Reference 

From paragraph 7: “Where does this prejudice come from? Paul Bloom of Yale University has a suggestion: he reckons part of the pleasure we get from art stems from the creative process behind the work.”
 

Explanation

A study by David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University sheds light on the issue of why people enjoy machine-generated art but recoil upon discovering its origins. Moffat asked both expert musicians and non-experts to assess six compositions without informing them of the origins of the pieces. Therefore, the answer is false.

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Q. How can I improve my vocabulary for the IELTS Reading test?

Ans.  Read a variety of materials, like newspapers, magazines and literary articles to understand new words in context so that you can improve your vocabulary for the IELTS reading test. To keep a record of unfamiliar words and their meanings, and to review them regularly, keep a vocabulary journal. In addition, to enhance your word bank for the test, use vocabulary-building resources such as flashcards, dictionaries, and online platforms that offer lists of words or exercises.

Q. What are some useful tips for tackling the IELTS Reading test's True/False/Not Given questions?

Ans.  In the case of True, False, or Not Given the questions in the IELTS Reading test, focus on the specific information given in the passage. Caution should be exercised with synonyms, since the statement may have been changed. Verify that the information is directly in line with "True" or does not conflict with "False" or if there is no sufficient data to make a decision on "Not Given." Consideration should be given to the subtle differences between the content of the statement and the content of the passage, as well as to the practice of identifying these subtle differences.

Q. How can I improve my comprehension skills for the IELTS Reading test?

Ans.  Practice active reading by reading a variety of texts in order to improve your understanding of the IELTS Reading test. In order to rapidly identify major ideas and specific details, we are developing techniques of scanning and skimming. Work on expanding your vocabulary, as a richer word bank aids in understanding diverse passages. In order to simulate the exam conditions and to improve your ability to extract information effectively, take regular practice tests.

Q. What is a good score for my IELTS Reading module?

Ans.  A good score for the IELTS Reading module depends on your individual goals and the requirements of the institution or organisation you're applying to. In general, however, it is considered that a score of 6.5 to 7 or higher out of 9 represents strong and satisfies the language proficiency requirements for several purposes both in terms of studies and work. It's essential to check the specific score requirements of your desired institution or organization for accurate guidance.

Q. What is the average score for the IELTS Reading test?

Ans.  The average score for the IELTS Reading test differs according to the students taking it, as well as the context in which they are being tested. In general, however, the average reading score for IELTS is between 6 and 6.5 out of nine. In order to allow individuals to understand and respond to a range of texts at an academic or professional level, this score indicates an adequate level of English proficiency.

Q. What are some good books for IELTS Reading test preparation?

Ans.  Consider using resources such as the Cambridge IELTS series, which provides authentic practice tests and detailed explanations in preparation for your reading test. Another valuable option is "Barron's IELTS Superpack", which provides comprehensive materials tailored to each section of the IELTS test, including Reading, with effective strategies and practice content.

Q. What is an IELTS Reading test?

Ans.  The IELTS Reading test is one component of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). It assesses the reading comprehension skills of candidates seeking to study or work in English-speaking countries. The test comprises three sections with a range of texts, including articles, advertising and academic material, then comprehension questions that assess the ability to read major ideas, find particular information and be able to respond to detailed explanations.

Q. How long is the IELTS Reading test?

Ans.  It takes 60 minutes for an IELTS reading test. During this period, 40 questions are to be answered by candidates in three sections. The passages are complex and include a wide range of topics in order to test the candidate's ability to make quick, accurate connections. In order to successfully complete the test, effective time management is essential.

Q. How many passages are there in the IELTS Reading test?

Ans.  There are usually three passages of the IELTS Reading test. A set of questions assessing the candidate's ability to comprehend and analyse the information given in this text will follow each passage. The passages are intended to give an overall assessment of a candidate's reading ability, and may vary in length and complexity from one topic to another.

Q. What is the minimum score required in the IELTS Reading test?

Ans.  Depending on the institution or organisation you are applying to and their specific English language proficiency requirements, the minimum score required for the IELTS Reading test differs. For many education institutions and for immigration purposes, a band score of at least 5.0 is deemed to be an appropriate level. Nevertheless, in order to be able to provide accurate guidance, it is necessary to check that your intended institution or organisation has the required level of score.

Q. Can I retake the IELTS Reading test alone?

Ans.  No, it is not possible to repeat the IELTS Reading test on your own. Four modules are included in the IELTS test: Listening, Reading, Writing and Communication. You must retake the entire test, including all four sections if you want to take back a specific module. Each module contributes to the overall band score, and retaking just one module is not an option within the IELTS examination system.