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Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading Answers: IELTS Reading Practice Test

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Updated on Jul 02, 2024, 11:57

The reading module is one of the most challenging parts of the IELTS exam. This section is too vast and covers 40 questions that should be answered in 60 minutes. Three long passages are given, which have to be read thoroughly to find the answers. 

 

However, when you start practising the different sets of questions, you will be able to grasp them and solve all the questions within the given time. 
 

So, without waiting, let’s practise the topic of air traffic control in the USA and learn how to answer the questions effectively. 

 

We have also included tips, tricks, and explanations in this practice test to help you solve the IELTS reading questions. 

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1. Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading Passages

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 1-13 based on Reading Passage 1 below.

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2. Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading Question & Answers

Have you read the passage? Now, take the test and find Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading answers! Try to answer these questions by yourself before you sneak a peek at the answers given below. 

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1.

Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading Passages

General Instructions to Follow During the IELTS Reading Test

The following instructions will help you save time and improve your scores in the Air Traffic Control In The USA reading questions and answers.

  • Pay attention to the instructions given before the questions. Read it carefully and understand what’s being asked of you.
  • The reading passages are typically ordered with slightly increasing difficulty levels. To save time, try to answer the most challenging parts first.
  • Keep an eye on the clock. Every IELTS Exam centre has a clock on the wall. Watch it to stay ahead of your time limit.
  • Use skimming and scanning techniques and scan for keywords to answer questions.

 

 

 

 

 

Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading Passage

 

 

A. An accident in the skies over the Grand Canyon in 1956 resulted in the establishing of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to regulate and oversee aircraft operations in the skies over the United States, which were becoming quite congested. The resulting structure of air traffic control has dramatically increased flight safety in the United States, and similar air traffic control procedures are also in place over much of the rest of the world.
 

B. Rudimentary air traffic control (ATC) existed well before the Grand Canyon disaster. As early as the 1920s, the earliest air traffic controllers manually guided aircraft near the airports, using lights and flags. In contrast, beacons and flashing lights were placed along cross-country routes to establish the earliest airways. However, this purely visual system could have been more helpful in bad weather, and by the 1930s, radio communication was coming into use for ATC. New York City was the first region to have something that approximated today's ATC, with other major metropolitan areas following soon after.

 

C. In the 1940s, ATC centres could and did take advantage of the newly developed radar and improved radio communication brought about by the Second World War, but the system remained rudimentary. It was only after the creation of the FAA that full-scale regulation of America's airspace took place, and this was fortuitous, for the advent of the jet engine suddenly resulted in a large number of high-speed planes, reducing pilots' margin of error and practically demanding some set of rules to keep everyone well separated and operating safely in the air.

 

D. Many people think that ATC consists of a row of controllers sitting in front of their radar screens at the nation's airports, telling arriving and departing traffic what to do. This needs to be completed in the picture. The FAA realised that the airspace over the United States would at any time have many different kinds of planes flying for many different purposes in various weather conditions, and the same kind of structure was needed to accommodate all of them.

 

E. To meet this challenge, the following elements were put into effect. First, ATC extends virtually to the entire United States. From 365m above the ground and higher, the entire country is generally blanketed by controlled airspace. In certain areas, mainly near airports, controlled airspace extends to 215m above the ground and, near an airport, down to the surface. Controlled airspace is the airspace in which FAA regulations apply. Elsewhere, in uncontrolled airspace, pilots are bound by fewer regulations. In this way, the recreational pilot who wishes to fly for a while without all the restrictions imposed by the FAA must stay in uncontrolled airspace below 365m. In contrast, the pilot who does want the protection afforded by ATC can quickly enter the controlled airspace.

 

F. The FAA then recognised two types of operating environments. In good meteorological conditions, flying would be permitted under Visual Flight Rules (VFR), which suggests a firm reliance on visual cues to maintain an acceptable level of safety. Poor visibility necessitated a set of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), under which the pilot relied on altitude and navigational information provided by the plane's instrument panel to fly safely. On a clear day, a pilot in controlled airspace can choose a VFR or IFR flight plan, and the FAA regulations were devised to accommodate both VFR and IFR operations in the same airspace. However, a pilot can only choose to fly IFR if they possess an instrument rating above and beyond the basic pilot's licence, which must also be held.
 

G. Controlled airspace is divided into several types, designated by alphabet letters. Uncontrolled airspace is designated Class F, while controlled airspace below 5,490m above sea level and not near an airport is Class E. All airspace above 5,490m is designated Class A. The reason for the division of Class E and Class A airspace is the type of planes operating. Generally, Class E airspace is where one finds general aviation aircraft (few can climb above 5,490m anyway) and commercial turboprop aircraft. Above 5,490m is the realm of heavy jets since jet engines operate more efficiently at higher altitudes. The difference between Class E and A airspace is that all operations are IFR in Class A, and pilots must be instrument-rated, skilled and licensed in aircraft instrumentation. This is because ATC control of the entire space is essential. Three other types of airspace, Classes D, C and B, govern the vicinity of airports. These correspond roughly to small municipal, medium-sized, and major metropolitan airports and encompass an increasingly rigorous set of regulations. For example, all a VFR pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace is establish two-way radio contact with ATC. No explicit permission from ATC to enter is needed, although the pilot must continue to obey all regulations governing VFR flight. An explicit ATC clearance is required to enter Class B airspace, such as approaching a major metropolitan airport. The private pilot who cruises without permission into this airspace risks losing their licence.

2.

Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading Question & Answers

Have you read the passage? Now, take the test and find Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading answers! 
 

Leap to Learn: Tip of the Moment!

Remember, most of these questions follow the order of the passage, so it’s easy to trace back if you look through the paragraphs sequentially.

 

Try to answer these questions by yourself before you sneak a peek at the answers given below. 
 

Good luck! 

Questions and Answers 1-6

Type of Question: Matching Headings


  • This passage has 7 paragraphs ranging from A to G.
  • Choose the correct heading for paragraphs A and C-G from the list below.
  • Write the correct number, i-x, on your air traffic control in the USA reading answers sheet in boxes 1-6.

 

 

List of Headings

 

  1. Disobeying FAA regulations
  2. Aviation disaster prompts action
  3. Two coincidental developments
  4. Setting altitude zones
  5. An oversimplified view
  6. Controlling pilots’ licences
  7. Defining airspace categories
  8. Setting rules to weather conditions
  9. Taking off safely
  10. First steps towards ATC
     

List of Paragraphs
 

Paragraph A

Paragraph C

Paragraph D

Paragraph E

Paragraph F

Paragraph G

 

Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading Answers with Explanation (1-6)

 

Type of Question: Matching Headings
 

In this task,  you will be given the headings and match each paragraph to the heading that best summarises its content. 
 

How to answer the question:
 

  • Scan the passage to get a general idea of its content and structure.
  • Read the headings provided for the paragraphs to understand their meaning.
  • Identify keywords and phrases in the headings and scan the passage for similar terms.
  • Eliminate headings that do not match the content of a paragraph.
  • Consider the overall theme of each paragraph when matching headings.
  • Use the process of elimination to narrow down choices and verify answer selection.

 

1. Paragraph A - ii

 

Reference

 

From Paragraph A: “An accident that occurred in the skies over the Grand Canyon in 1956 …..which were becoming quite congested.”

 

Keywords

FAA, regulate
 

Explanation

Paragraph A mentioned how a plane crash over the Grand Canyon in 1956 created the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to regulate and oversee aeroplane operations. This event is seen as the main reason for changes in the aviation industry.


 

2. Paragraph C - iii

 

Reference

 

From Paragraph C: “It was only after the creation of the FAA …. demanding some set of rules to keep everyone well separated and operating safely in the air.”

 

Keywords

creation, regulation 
 

Explanation

Paragraph C mentions how the fortuitous developments of radar and improved radio communication during World War II played a crucial role in the evolution of air traffic control systems, laying the groundwork for enhanced regulation.


 

3. Paragraph D - v

 

Reference

 

From Paragraph D: “Many people think that ATC consists of a row of controllers…and the same kind of structure was needed to accommodate all of them.”
 

Keywords

think, incomplete, purpose
 

Explanation

Paragraph D explains that air traffic control is more than just guiding planes around airports; it's a comprehensive system that manages different types of airspace and aircraft.


 

4. Paragraph E - iv

 

Reference

 

From Paragraph E: “To meet this challenge, the following elements were put…afforded by ATC can easily enter the controlled airspace.”

 

Keywords

Airspace, higher, above 

 

Explanation

Paragraph E explains how controlled airspace is divided into different altitude zones. These zones have FAA regulations that apply to them, and pilots can choose which zone to fly is based on their flight plans and preferences.
 

5. Paragraph F - viii

 

Reference

 

From Paragraph F: “The FAA then recognised two types of operating environments … above and beyond the basic pilot’s license that must also be held.”
 

Keywords

meteorological, environment
 

Explanation

Paragraph F explains the distinction between Visual Flight Rules (VFR) and Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), mentioning how regulations are adjusted based on different weather conditions to ensure safe flying.

 

6. Paragraph G - vii

 

Reference

 

From Paragraph G: “Controlled airspace is divided into several different types, … private pilot who cruises without permission into this airspace risks losing their license.”
 

Keywords

designated, division 

 

Explanation

In Paragraph G, the classification of airspace is mentioned in detail. The categories are based on the functions and characteristics of the airspace, and this framework is essential for understanding the system of controlled and uncontrolled airspace.

Questions and Answers 7-13
Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?
In boxes 7-13 on your answer sheet, write.

  • TRUE if the statement agrees with the information
  • FALSE if the statement contradicts the information
  • NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

 

7.   The FAA was created as a result of the introduction of the jet engine.

8.   Air Traffic Control started after the Grand Canyon crash in 1956.

9.   Beacons and flashing lights are still used by ATC today.

10. Some improvements were made in radio communication during World War II.

11. Class F airspace is airspace which is below 365m and not near airports.

12. All aircraft in Class E airspace must use IFR.

13. A pilot entering Class C airspace is flying over an average-sized city.


 

Air Traffic Control In The USA Reading Answers with Explanation (7-13)

 

Type of question: True/False/Not Given 
 

Here’s how to find the history of glass reading answers:
 

  • Read the given question statements carefully and note down the keywords
  • With the help of the keywords, locate them in the passage, which will help you decide whether the given statement is true or false. 
  • Your answer will only be given if the information is in the passage, if not then mention not given. 

 

7. False

 

Reference:

 

From Paragraph C: “It was only after the creation of the FAA.. keep everyone well separated and operating safely in the air.”
 

Keywords

FAA, creation
 

Explanation

According to paragraph C, the given statement contradicts the information provided as the creation of the FAA was prompted by the 1956 Grand Canyon accident rather than the introduction of the jet engine.


 

8. False

 

Reference:

 

From Paragraph B: “Rudimentary air traffic control (ATC) existed well before the Grand Canyon disaster.”

 

Keywords

Grand Canyon, disaster 
 

Explanation

Paragraph B states that the given statement contradicts the provided information. It states that rudimentary air traffic control existed well before the Grand Canyon disaster, with some form of ATC already in place in the 1920s.


 

9. Not Given

 

Reference:

 

From Paragraph: Not available
 

Keywords:

Not available

 

Explanation

The passage does not clarify whether the current air traffic control system still incorporates beacons and flashing lights, so the answer is "Not Given."


 

10. True

 

Reference:

 

From Paragraph D: “ATC consists of a row of controllers sitting in front of their radar screens at the nation’s airports, telling arriving and departing traffic what to do.”
 

Keywords

Improved communication, World War II
 

Explanation

This statement agrees with Paragraph C, which says that improvements in radio communication during World War II helped advance air traffic control.


 

11. True

 

Reference:

 

From Paragraph E: “In certain areas, mainly near airports, controlled airspace extends down to 215m above the ground, and, near an airport, all the way down to the surface.”

 

Keywords

airspace, surface
 

Explanation

The given statement aligns with the details presented in Paragraph E, where it is stated that Class F airspace is situated below 365m and is not near airports, which matches the given description.

 

12. False

 

Reference:

 

From Paragraph G: “The difference between Class E and A airspace is that all operations are IFR in Class A.”

 

Keywords

Difference, class E, IFR
 

Explanation

Paragraph G explains that pilots flying in controlled airspace can choose between Visual Flight Rules (VFR) and Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), meaning that not all aircraft in Class E airspace are required to use IFR.

 

13. True

 

Reference:

 

From Paragraph G: “These correspond roughly to small municipal, medium-sized metropolitan and major metropolitan airports respectively.”
 

Keywords

Class C, medium-sized
 

Explanation

The content of Paragraph G agrees with the given statement, as it describes that Class C airspace is typically situated around an average-sized city, aligning with the provided description.

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FAQs

Q. What are the criteria for determining the IELTS Reading score?

A. Various criteria determine the score of IELTS Reading. These include the accuracy of answers, coherence of answers about the passage, the depth of comprehension displayed, the range and appropriateness of vocabulary used, the accuracy of language usage, and whether all questions have been answered. These factors collectively contribute to the final score.

Q. Is grammar necessary for the IELTS Reading test?

A. Proper grammar can help you understand sentence structure, which is essential for understanding the passages accurately. It can also help you express your answers clearly and effectively. A good grasp of grammar helps in understanding sentence structure, which is crucial for comprehending passages accurately. It also supports expressing the answers effectively. 

Q. Should I first read the passage or questions for my IELTS Reading test?

A. When taking the IELTS Reading test, it's recommended to scan the questions first. However, the approach may vary based on personal preference. Experiment with both methods to determine what works best for you and manage your time effectively.

Q. How can I stay calm and focused during the IELTS Reading test?

A. To achieve your best performance during the IELTS Reading test, staying calm and focused is essential. You can start by practising relaxation techniques, like deep breathing, to calm your nerves. While taking the exam, manage your time wisely and avoid getting stuck on difficult questions. Stay focused by taking one question at a time and avoiding distractions.

Q. What are some common misconceptions about the IELTS Reading test?

A. One of the most common misconceptions regarding the IELTS Reading test is that you need to read every word of the passage to answer the questions accurately. Still, you can often extract the meaning from the context. Another myth is that there's only one correct answer for each question, but sometimes, more than one answer can be correct, so it's crucial to evaluate all options carefully. 

Q. Are spelling mistakes penalised for the IELTS Reading test?

A. Spelling accuracy is crucial in the IELTS Reading test. Though minor errors may not affect your score, frequent or significant mistakes can lead to mark deductions. However, you can avoid this by proofreading your answers for spelling accuracy, especially for proper nouns and keywords.

Q. What is the band score range for the IELTS Reading module?

A. In the IELTS Reading module, the band score ranges from 0 to 9, with each band indicating a particular level of English proficiency, from non-user (band 0) to expert (band 9). Your reading comprehension skills are evaluated to determine your score, with criteria like answer accuracy, coherence, and passage understanding influencing the final band score.

Q. How can I improve my vocabulary for the IELTS Reading test?

A. To improve your vocabulary for the IELTS Reading test, read extensively in English, note unfamiliar words, and utilise resources like vocabulary apps and quizzes. Engage in active learning by using new words in context, writing sentences, and participating in discussions. Finally, regular revision and exposure to diverse materials will help expand your vocabulary effectively.

Q. Can I skip the IELTS Reading Module for my IELTS exam?

A. If you plan to take the IELTS exam, you must complete the reading module. The exam comprises four modules: Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. Each module evaluates distinct language abilities; all four are necessary to obtain an overall IELTS band score. Therefore, to complete the IELTS exam and get a legitimate score, you must participate in all four modules, including the Reading Module.

Q. Does the IELTS Reading module have more weightage?

A. It's important to note that each module of the IELTS exam includes Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. All these modules hold an equal weightage in determining the overall band score. Thus, no module has more weightage than the others. All four components are equally important in contributing to the final score. Therefore, preparing thoroughly for each module to achieve your desired overall band score in the IELTS exam is crucial.

Q. How can I get an 8.5 on the IELTS Reading?

A. To score 8.5 on IELTS Reading, prepare well by Practicing with authentic materials. Develop strategies, improve reading speed with scanning and skimming, and work on vocabulary and comprehension skills. Practice time management to complete the task within the given time.