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Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Answers: IELTS Reading Practice Test

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Updated on Jul 02, 2024, 11:57

The IELTS Reading section is designed to assess your reading skills. In this section, you will encounter a variety of texts, ranging from newspapers and magazines to academic journals. You will be tested on your ability to comprehend, analyse, and interpret the information presented within these texts.
 

Key highlights of the IELTS Reading section:

 

  • There are three passages in the Academic version and four passages in the General Training version.
  • You have 60 minutes to complete the entire section.
  • You must answer 40 questions based on the given passages.
  • Question types include multiple choice, matching headings, True/False/Not Given, sentence completion, and others.
     

In this passage, you will delve into the world of “Zoo Conservation Programmes”, exploring the vital role that zoos play in preserving endangered species and promoting biodiversity. You will learn about the efforts undertaken by zoos worldwide to protect and conserve threatened animal species, as well as the ethical considerations and controversies surrounding such initiatives.

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1. Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Passage

You should spend approximately 20 minutes answering Questions 1 - 13 based on the Reading Passage below. This approach can help manage time effectively during a reading comprehension activity or exam. 

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2. Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Zoo Conservation Programmes

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1.

Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Passage

General Information

  • Read Instructions: Understand each question before answering.
  • Manage Time: Spend about 20 minutes per passage.
  • Skim and Scan: Quickly get the main idea and find specific information.
  • Highlight Key Info: Underline essential words or phrases.
  • Answer All Questions: Attempt every question; no penalty for wrong answers.
  • Stay Focused: Avoid distractions and keep your attention on the task.
  • Check Spelling: Ensure correct spelling and grammar.
  • Transfer Answers Clearly: Write answers neatly on the answer sheet.
  • Don’t Dwell: Move on if stuck and return later.
  • Review: If time allows, review your answers.

 

 

 

 

Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Passage


 

 

Paragraph 1

One of London Zoo’s recent advertisements caused me some irritation, so patently did it distort reality. Headlined “Without zoos, you might as well tell these animals to get stuffed,” it was bordered with illustrations of several endangered species and went on to extol the myth that without zoos like London Zoo, these animals “will almost certainly disappear forever.” With the zoo world’s rather mediocre record on conservation, one might be forgiven for being slightly sceptical about such an advertisement.

 

Paragraph 2

Zoos were originally created as places of entertainment, and their suggested involvement with conservation didn’t seriously arise until about 30 years ago when the Zoological Society of London held the first formal international meeting on the subject. Eight years later, a series of world conferences took place entitled “The Breeding of Endangered Species”, and from this point onwards, conservation became the zoo community’s buzzword. This commitment has now been clearly defined in The World Zoo Conservation Strategy (WZGS, September 1993), which, although an important and welcome document, does seem to be based on an unrealistic optimism about the nature of the zoo industry.

 

Paragraph 3

The WZCS estimates that there are about 10,000 zoos in the world, of which around 1,000 represent a core of quality collections capable of participating in coordinated conservation programmes. This is probably the document’s first failing, as I believe that 10,000 is a serious underestimate of the total number of places masquerading as zoological establishments. Of course, it is difficult to get accurate data but to put the issue into perspective, I have found that, in a year of working in Eastern Europe, I discovered fresh zoos on almost a weekly basis.

 

Paragraph 4

The second flaw in the reasoning of the WZCS document is the naive faith it places in its 1,000 core zoos. One would assume that the calibre of these institutions would have been carefully examined, but it appears that the criterion for inclusion on this select list might merely be that the zoo is a member of a zoo federation or association. This might be a good starting point, working on the premise that members must meet certain standards, but again, the facts don’t support the theory. The greatly respected American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums (AAZPA) has had extremely dubious members, and in the UK, the Federation of Zoological Gardens of Great Britain and Ireland has occasionally had members who have been roundly censured in the national press. These include Robin Hill Adventure Park on the Isle of Wight, which many consider the most notorious collection of animals in the country. This establishment, which for years was protected by the Isle’s local council (which viewed it as a tourist amenity), was finally closed down following a damning report by a veterinary inspector appointed under the terms of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981. As it was always a collection of dubious repute, one is obliged to reflect upon the standards that the Zoo Federation sets when granting membership. The situation is even worse in developing countries where little money is available for redevelopment, and it is hard to see a way to incorporate collections into the overall scheme of the WZCS.

 

Paragraph 5 

Even assuming that the WZCS’s 1,000 core zoos are all of a high standard, complete with scientific staff and research facilities, trained and dedicated keepers, accommodation that permits normal or natural behaviour, and a policy of cooperating fully with one another, what might be the potential for conservation? Colin Tudge, author of Last Animals at the Zoo (Oxford University Press, 1992), argues that “if the world”s zoos worked together in cooperative breeding programmes, then even without further expansion, they could save around 2,000 species of endangered land vertebrates. This seems an extremely optimistic proposition from a man who must be aware of the failings and weaknesses of the zoo industry, the man who, when a member of the council of London Zoo, had to persuade the zoo to devote more of its activities to conservation. Moreover, where are the facts to support such optimism?

 

Paragraph 6

Today, approximately 16 species might be said to have been “saved” by captive breeding programmes, although a number of these can hardly be looked upon as resounding successes. Beyond that, about a further 20 species are being seriously considered for zoo conservation programmes. Given that the international conference at London Zoo was held 30 years ago, this is pretty slow progress and a long way off Tudge’s target of 2,000.

2.

Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Zoo Conservation Programmes

Questions and Answers 1-7
Do the following statements agree with the information given in the Reading Passage?
In boxes 1-7 on your answer sheet, write

  • YES if the statement agrees with the information given
  • NO if the statement contradicts the information given
  • NOT GIVEN if there is no information about this

 

 

1. London Zoo’s advertisements are dishonest.

2. Zoos made an insignificant contribution to conservation up until 30 years ago.

3. The WZCS document is not known in Eastern Europe.

4. Zoos in the WZCS select list were carefully inspected.

5. No one knew how the animals were being treated at Robin Hill Adventure Park.

6. Colin Tudge was dissatisfied with the treatment of animals at the London Zoo.

7. The number of successful zoo conservation programmes is unsatisfactory.


 

Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Answers with Explanations (1-7)

 

Type of question: Yes/No/Not Given(True/False/Not Given)

 

In this question type, you are required to determine whether the statements provided agree with, contradict, or are not mentioned in the reading passage. 

 

How to best answer: 
 

  • Understand what information is being presented and what is being asked.
  • Find relevant information in the reading passage that relates to the statement.
  • Determine if the statement agrees with, contradicts, or is not mentioned in the passage.
  • If the information is not explicitly provided in the passage, select 'Not Given' rather than making assumptions.
  • Base your answers solely on the information presented in the passage, avoiding personal opinions or outside knowledge.

 

 

1. Yes

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 1: "One of London Zoo’s recent advertisements caused me some irritation, so patently did it distort reality."

 

Explanation

The author expresses irritation towards London Zoo’s advertisements, labelling them as dishonest due to their distortion of reality regarding the conservation of endangered animal species. This aligns with the statement that London Zoo’s advertisements are dishonest.


 

2. Yes

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 2: "Zoos were originally created as places of entertainment, and their suggested involvement with conservation didn’t seriously arise until about 30 years ago."

 

Explanation

The passage confirms that zoos had primarily been places of entertainment until about 30 years ago, when serious involvement with conservation began, supporting the statement that zoos made an insignificant contribution to conservation up until 30 years ago.


 

3. Not Given

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph: N.A.

 

Explanation

There is no context in the passage regarding the awareness or familiarity of the WZCS document in Eastern Europe, so it's impossible to determine whether the statement is true or false.


 

4. No

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 4: "One would assume that the calibre of these institutions would have been carefully examined, but it appears that the criterion for inclusion on this select list might merely be that the zoo is a member of a zoo federation or association."

 

Explanation

The passage indicates that the criterion for inclusion in the WZCS select list might not involve careful inspection, as some zoos with dubious reputations have been included. Thus, the statement that zoos in the WZCS select list were carefully inspected contradicts the writer's view.


 

5. No

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 4: "These include Robin Hill Adventure Park on the Isle of Wight, which many consider the most notorious collection of animals in the country."
 

Explanation

The passage indicates that people knew about the treatment of animals at Robin Hill Adventure Park, contradicting the statement that no one knew how the animals were being treated there.


 

6. Not Given

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph: N.A.
 

Explanation

The passage doesn't explicitly mention Colin Tudge's satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the treatment of animals at London Zoo, making it impossible to determine whether the statement is true or false.


 

7. Yes

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 5: "Even assuming that the WZCS’s 1,000 core Zoos are all of a high standard, complete with scientific staff and research facilities. Moreover, this is pretty slow progress and a long way off Tudge’s target of 2,000."
 

Explanation

The passage suggests that the progress of zoo conservation programs has been slow, indicating dissatisfaction with their success rate. Therefore, the statement that the number of successful zoo conservation programs is unsatisfactory agrees with the writer's views.

Questions and Answers 8-10
  • Choose the appropriate letters A-D and write them in boxes 8-10 on your answer sheet.

 

 

8. What were the objectives of the WZCS document?

 

  1. to improve the calibre of zoos worldwide.
  2. to identify zoos suitable for conservation practice.
  3. to provide funds for zoos in underdeveloped countries.
  4. to list the endangered species of the world.

 

9.   Why does the writer refer to Robin Hill Adventure Park?

 

  1. to support the Isle of Wight local council.
  2. to criticise the 1981 Zoo Licensing Act.
  3. to illustrate a weakness in the WZCS document.
  4. to exemplify the standards in AAZPA zoos.

 

10.  What word best describes the writer’s response to Colin Tudges’ prediction on captive breeding programmes?

 

  1. disbelieving
  2. impartial
  3. prejudiced
  4. accepting


 

Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Answers with Explanations (8-10)

 

Type of question: Multiple choice questions

 

In this question type, you are asked to answer the question followed by several options, typically lettered A, B, C, or D. The task is to select the correct answer from the given choices based on the information provided in the reading passage.

 

How to best answer: 
 

  • Read the question carefully and understand what it asks.
  • Pay attention to the keywords in the question.
  • Skim the passage quickly to locate relevant information.
  • Eliminate the clearly incorrect options.
  • Select the answer that best fits the information in the passage


 

8. B - to identify zoos suitable for conservation practice.

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 3: "The WZCS estimates that there are about 10,000 zoos in the world, of which around 1,000 represent a core of quality collections capable of participating in coordinated conservation programmes."

 

Explanation

This line from Paragraph 3 indicates that one of the objectives of the WZCS document was to identify zoos suitable for conservation practice, aligning with option B.


 

9. C - to illustrate a weakness in the WZCS document.

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 4: "This establishment, which for years was protected by the Isle’s local council (which viewed it as a tourist amenity), was finally closed down following a damning report by a veterinary inspector appointed under the terms of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981."
 

Explanation

The reference to Robin Hill Adventure Park in Paragraph 4 serves to exemplify a weakness in the WZCS document, highlighting flaws in the zoo industry standards and membership criteria, as mentioned in the passage. This aligns with option C.


 

10. A - disbelieving

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 6: "Today approximately 16 species might be said to have been “saved” by captive breeding programmes, although a number of these can hardly be looked upon, furthermore, given that the international conference at London Zoo was held 30 years ago, this is pretty slow progress, and a long way off Tudge’s target of 2,000."

 

Explanation

The author's response to Colin Tudge's prediction on captive breeding programs, as stated in Paragraph 6, reflects doubt regarding the slow progress and the significant gap between Tudge's ambitious target and the actual achievements. Thus, the word "disbelieving" accurately captures the author's sentiment, which is in line with option A.

Questions and Answers 11-13
  • The writer mentions a number of factors which lead him to doubt the value of the WZCS document.
  • Which THREE of the following factors are mentioned?
  • Write your answers A-F in boxes 11-13 on your answer sheet.

 

 

List of Factors

 

A. The number of unregistered Zoos in the world.

B. The lack of money in developing countries.

C. The actions of the Isle of Wight local council.

D. The failure of the WZCS to examine the standards of the “core Zoos”.

E. The unrealistic aim of the WZCS in view of the number of species “saved” to date.

F. The policies of WZCS Zoo managers.

 

 

Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Answers with Explanations (11-13)

 

Type of question: Matching information

 

In this question type, you will be asked to match specific pieces of information, often dates, names, or events, from the reading passage with corresponding options provided in the question.

 

How to best answer: 
 

  • Read each statement carefully to understand the specific information being asked for.
  • Scan the passage for relevant dates or events in the reading passage that corresponds to each statement.
  • Eliminate incorrect options that do not match the information found in the passage.
  • Match the remaining options based on the information provided in the passage.
  • Verify your answers to ensure they match the information in the passage before finalising them.


 

11. A (Any order: A/D/E)

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 5: "Even assuming that the WZCS’s 1,000 core zoos are all of a high standard, complete with scientific staff and research facilities, trained and dedicated keepers, accommodation that permits normal or natural behaviour, and a policy of cooperating fully with one another, what might be the potential for conservation? Colin Tudge, author of Last Animals at the Zoo (Oxford University Press, 1992), argues that “if the world”s zoos worked together in cooperative breeding programmes, then even without further expansion, they could save around 2,000 species of endangered land vertebrates."

 

Explanation

The doubt about the WZCS document arises because, despite the high standards of the core zoos it mentions, there's scepticism about their actual potential for conservation. The reference to the need for cooperation among zoos globally suggests concern about the unaccounted number of zoos and their impact on conservation efforts.


 

12. D (Any order: A/D/E)

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 4: "The second flaw in the reasoning of the WZCS document is the naive faith it places in its 1,000 core zoos. One would assume that the calibre of these institutions would have been carefully examined, but it appears that the criterion for inclusion on this select list might merely be that the zoo is a member of a zoo federation or association. This might be a good starting point, working on the premise that members must meet certain standards, but again, the facts don’t support the theory."

 

Explanation

The doubt regarding the WZCS document arises from its failure to rigorously evaluate the standards of the core zoos it endorses. By suggesting that inclusion may be based solely on affiliation with certain organisations rather than merit, the passage casts doubt on the credibility of the WZCS's assertions.


 

13. E (Any order: A/D/E)

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 8: "Today, approximately 16 species might be said to have been “saved” by captive breeding programmes, although a number of these can hardly be looked upon as resounding successes. —-----   Given that the international conference at London Zoo was held 30 years ago, this is pretty slow progress and a long way off Tudge’s target of 2,000.
 

Explanation

The discrepancy between the number of species "saved" by captive breeding programs and the ambitious target proposed by the WZCS suggests that the goal set by the WZCS is unrealistic, leading to doubt about its efficacy.

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FAQs

Q. How can I improve my comprehension skills for the IELTS Reading test?

Ans. To improve your comprehension skills for the IELTS reading test, you can:
 

1. Read regularly.

2. Practice skimming and scanning techniques.

3. Focus on learning new words.

4. Pay attention to context clues.

5. Practice with sample tests.
 

Following these strategies can help you improve your performance in the IELTS reading test.

Q. How can I stay calm and focused during the IELTS Reading test?

Ans. To do well in the IELTS reading test, stay calm and focused. Practice mindfulness, manage your time, stay hydrated, stay relaxed, review questions carefully, and think positively. Following these strategies will help you perform your best. 


 

Q. Can I take the IELTS reading test only?

Ans. Yes, you can choose to take just the IELTS reading test without taking other modules like listening, writing, or speaking. However, keep in mind that the reading test alone won't provide you with a complete IELTS score.