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The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Answers: IELTS Reading Practice Test

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Updated on Jul 09, 2024, 11:15

The IELTS Reading section challenges your ability to comprehend and analyse written English in various academic contexts. It consists of three passages sourced from books, magazines, journals, and newspapers, each increasing in complexity. Following each passage are questions designed to assess your skills in identifying main ideas, understanding implicit meanings, and discerning writer perspectives and attitudes.


 

To better prepare for the IELTS Reading section, you can take an IELTS practice test, which provides a realistic experience of the types of texts and questions you will face in the actual exam.


 

In this passage, you will explore the topic “The Hollywood Film Industry ”.It explores how Hollywood became synonymous with global cinema, its impact on culture, and the transformations within the industry over the decades. This text provides insights into key figures, major film movements, and the economic and cultural influences that shaped Hollywood into what it is today.

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1. The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Passage

You should spend approximately 20 minutes answering Questions 1 - 13 based on the Reading Passage below. This approach can help manage time effectively during a reading comprehension activity or exam.  


 

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2. The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Answers

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1.

The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Passage

General Information

  • Read Instructions: Understand each question before answering.
  • Manage Time: Spend about 20 minutes per passage.
  • Skim and Scan: Quickly get the main idea and find specific information.
  • Highlight Key Info: Underline essential words or phrases.
  • Answer All Questions: Attempt every question; no penalty for wrong answers.
  • Stay Focused: Avoid distractions and keep your attention on the task.
  • Check Spelling: Ensure correct spelling and grammar.
  • Transfer Answers Clearly: Write answers neatly on the answer sheet.
  • Don’t Dwell: Move on if stuck and return later.
  • Review: If time allows, review your answers.

 

 

 

The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Passage

 

 

Paragraph A

 

This chapter examines the ‘Golden Age’ of the Hollywood film studio system and explores how a particular kind of filmmaking developed during this period in US film history. It also focuses on the two key elements which influenced the emergence of the classic Hollywood studio system: the advent of sound and the business ideal of vertical integration. In addition to its historical interest, inspecting the growth of the studio system may offer clues regarding the kinds of struggles that accompany the growth of any new medium. It might, in fact, be intriguing to examine which changes occurred during the growth of the Hollywood studio and compare those changes to contemporary struggles in which production companies are trying to define and control emerging industries, such as online film and interactive television.

 

 

Paragraph B

 

The shift of the industry away from ‘silent’ films began during the late 1920s. Warner Bros.’s 1927 film The Jazz Singer was the first to feature synchronised speech, and with it came a period of turmoil for the industry. Studios now had proof that ‘talkie’ films would make their money, but the financial investment this kind of filmmaking would require, from new camera equipment to new projection facilities, made the studios hesitant to invest at first. In the end, the power of cinematic sound to both move audiences and enhance the story persuaded studios that talkies were worth investing in. Overall, the use of sound in film was well-received by audiences, but there were still many technical factors to consider. Although full integration of sound into movies was complete by 1930, it would take somewhat longer for them to regain their stylistic elegance and dexterity. The camera now had to be encased in a big, clumsy, immovable soundproof box. In addition, actors struggled, having to direct their speech to awkwardly hidden microphones in huge plants, telephones or even costumes.

 

 

Paragraph C

 

Vertical integration is the other key component in the rise of the Hollywood studio system. The major studios realised they could increase their profits by handling each stage of a film’s life: production (making the film), distribution (getting the film out to people) and exhibition (owning the theatres in major cities where films were shown first). Five studios, ‘The Big Five’, worked to achieve vertical integration through the late 1940s, owning vast real estate on which to construct elaborate sets. In addition, these studios set the exact terms of films’ release dates and patterns. Warner Bros., Paramount, 20th Century Fox, MGM and RKO formed this exclusive club. ‘The Little Three’ studios – Universal, Columbia and United Artists – also made pictures, but each lacked one of the crucial elements of vertical integration. Together, these eight companies operated as a mature oligopoly, essentially running the entire market.

 

 

Paragraph D

 

During the Golden Age, the studios were remarkably consistent and stable enterprises, due in large part to long-term management heads – the infamous ‘movie moguls’ who ruled their kingdoms with iron fists. At MGM, Warner Bros, and Columbia, the same men ran their studios for decades. The rise of the studio system also hinges on the treatment of stars, which were constructed and exploited to suit a studio’s image and schedule. Actors were bound up in seven-year contracts to a single studio, and the studio boss generally held all the options. Stars could be loaned out to other production companies at any time. Studio bosses could also force bad roles on actors and manipulate every single detail of stars’ images with their mammoth in-house publicity departments. Some have compared the Hollywood studio system to a factory, and it is useful to remember that studios were out to make money first and art second.

 

 

Paragraph E

 

On the other hand, studios also had to cultivate flexibility in addition to consistent factory output. Studio heads realised that they couldn’t make virtually the same film over and over again with the same cast of stars and still expect to keep turning a profit. They also had to create product differentiation. Examining how each production company tried to differentiate itself has led to loose characterisations of individual studios’ styles. MGM tended to put out a lot of all-star productions while Paramount excelled in comedy, and Warner Bros developed a reputation for gritty social realism. 20th Century Fox forged the musical and a great deal of prestige biographies, while Universal specialised in classic horror movies.

 

 

Paragraph F

 

In 1948, struggling independent movie producers and exhibitors finally triumphed in their battle against the big studios’ monopolistic behaviour. In the United States versus Paramount federal decree of that year, the studios were ordered to give up their theatres in what is commonly referred to as ‘divestiture’ – opening the market to smaller producers. This, coupled with the advent of television in the 1950s, seriously compromised the studio system’s influence and profits. Hence, 1930 and 1948 are generally considered bookends to Hollywood’s Golden Age.

 

Read more about 350+ Vocabulary words for IELTS: Difficult & New English Words List For 2024

2.

The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about The Hollywood Film Industry 

Questions and Answers 1-6

  • Reading Passage has six paragraphs: A-F. Choose the correct heading for each paragraph from the list of headings below.

 

 

 

List of Headings

 

 

i. The power within each studio
ii. The movie industry adapts to innovation
iii. Contrasts between cinema and other media of the time
iv. The value of studying Hollywood’s Golden Age
v. Distinguishing themselves from the rest of the market
vi. A double attack on film studios’ power
vii. Gaining control of the industry
viii. The top movies of Hollywood’s Golden Age

 

 

1. Paragraph A
2. Paragraph B
3. Paragraph C
4. Paragraph D
5. Paragraph E
6. Paragraph F

 

 

 

The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Answers with Explanations (1-6)

 

 

 

Type of question: Matching Headings

 

In this question type, you will be asked to choose the correct heading for each paragraph from a list of headings provided. This type of question assesses your ability to understand the main idea or theme of each paragraph.

 

 

How to best answer: 

 

  • Familiarise yourself with the list of headings before reading the paragraphs. This helps you know what to look for.
  • Identify the main idea or theme of each paragraph by looking for topic sentences or recurring themes.
  • Find keywords or phrases that are similar to those in the headings. This can help you make connections.
  • Eliminate incorrect options that don't match any paragraphs to narrow down your choices.
  • Skim and Scan each paragraph efficiently to get a context about the content.



 

1. IV


 

Reference

 

From paragraph A: "This chapter investigates the 'Golden Age' of the Hollywood film studio system and investigates how a specific type of filmmaking emerged during this period in US film history ------------ the types of difficulties that precede the creation of every new medium."


 

Explanation

 

Paragraph A introduces the concept of Hollywood's Golden Age, highlighting its historical significance and the pivotal role of innovations like sound and vertical integration. Studying this era provides insights into the challenges and transformations that accompany the growth of new media, making it crucial for understanding the evolution of the film industry.


 

2. II


 

Reference

 

From paragraph B: “The shift of the industry away from ‘silent’ films began during the late 1920s  —-------------- In addition, actors struggled, having to direct their speech to awkwardly hidden microphones in huge plants, telephones or even costumes.


 

Explanation

 

Paragraph B discusses the industry's transition from silent films to talkies, exemplified by The Jazz Singer. This shift marked a significant upheaval in filmmaking, demonstrating how technological advancements revolutionised audience experiences and industry practices during that era.


 

3. VII


 

Reference

 

From paragraph C:  "Vertical integration is the other key component in the rise of the Hollywood studio system.-------------------------Together, these eight companies operated as a mature oligopoly, essentially running the entire market."

 


 

Explanation

 

 Paragraph C details how major studios consolidated power through vertical integration, controlling production, distribution, and exhibition. This strategy enabled them to dominate the market, shaping film production and consumption patterns and establishing a corporate framework that defined Hollywood's Golden Age.


 

4. I


 

Reference

 

From paragraph D: “During the Golden Age, the studios were remarkably consistent and stable enterprises, due in large part to long-term management heads —------ Hollywood studio system to a factory, and it is useful to remember that studios were out to make money first and art second.”


 

 

Explanation

 

Paragraph D highlights the stability and control exerted by studio heads, known as movie moguls, during Hollywood's Golden Age. Their authoritative management style ensured continuity and profitability, illustrating the centralised power structures that characterised studio operations at the time.


 

5. V


 

Reference

 

From paragraph E: “On the other hand, studios also had to cultivate flexibility in addition to consistent factory output. Studio heads realised —--------------- 20th Century Fox forged the musical and a great deal of prestige biographies, while Universal specialised in classic horror movies..”

 


 

Explanation

 

Paragraph E explores how studios differentiated themselves through genre specialisation and unique styles. This strategic diversification allowed studios like MGM, Paramount, Warner Bros., 20th Century Fox, and Universal to carve distinct identities in the market, catering to diverse audience preferences and sustaining commercial success.


 

6. VI


 

Reference

 

From paragraph C: “In 1948, struggling independent movie producers and exhibitors finally triumphed in their battle against the big studios’ monopolistic behaviour. In the United States versus ----------------Hence, 1930 and 1948 are generally considered bookends to Hollywood’s Golden Age.”


 

 

Explanation

 

Paragraph F discusses the decline of studio monopolies following the 1948 Paramount antitrust case and the rise of television. This legal and technological shift challenged the established dominance of major studios, opening doors for independent producers and reshaping the dynamics of the film industry.


 

Refer to tips and tricks for the IELTS Reading section to achieve a high band score.

Questions and Answers 7-10
Do the following statements agree with the information given in the Reading Passage?
In boxes 7-10 on your answer sheet, write

  • TRUE if the statement agrees with the information
  • FALSE if the statement contradicts the information
  • NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this in the passage

 

 

7. After The Jazz Singer came out, other studios immediately began making movies with synchronised sound.

8. There were some drawbacks to recording movie actors’ voices in the early 1930s.

9. There was intense competition between actors for contracts with the leading studios.

10. Studios had total control over how their actors were perceived by the public.

 

 

The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Answers with Explanations (7-10)

 

 

Type of question: Yes/No/Not Given(True/False/Not Given)

 

In this question type, you are required to determine whether the statements provided agree with, contradict, or are not mentioned in the reading passage. 

 

 

How to best answer: 
 

  • Understand what information is being presented and what is being asked.
  • Find relevant information in the reading passage that relates to the statement.
  • Determine if the statement agrees with, contradicts, or is not mentioned in the passage.
  • If the information is not explicitly provided in the passage, select 'Not Given' rather than making assumptions.
  • Base your answers solely on the information presented in the passage, avoiding personal opinions or outside knowledge.

 


 

7. False


 

Reference

 

From paragraph B: "Warner Bros.' 1927 film 'The Jazz Singer' was the first to feature synchronised speech, ushering in a period of turmoil for the industry." Studios now had confirmation that 'talkie' pictures would generate money, but the financial expenditure required in this type of filmmaking, from new camera equipment to new projection facilities, made studios wary of investing at first."


 

 

Explanation

 

Despite the success of Warner Bros.'s 'The Jazz Singer' in 1927 with synchronised speech, other studios did not immediately follow suit. The film industry initially hesitated due to the substantial financial investments required for new equipment and facilities. This cautious approach delayed the widespread adoption of talkie films, indicating that other studios did not immediately begin producing movies with synchronised sound after 'The Jazz Singer', contrary to the statement.



 

8. True


 

Reference

 

From paragraph B: "Although the sound was fully integrated into movies by 1930, it would take a little longer for them to regain their stylistic elegance and dexterity." The camera has to be enclosed in a large, cumbersome, immovable soundproof housing. Furthermore, performers had difficulty since they had to direct their words to awkwardly hidden microphones in enormous plants, telephones, or even clothes."


 

 

Explanation

 

By 1930, sound had been fully integrated into movies, but technical challenges persisted. The cumbersome soundproof equipment and hidden microphones posed difficulties for actors, impacting the early years of voice recording in films. This highlights the drawbacks experienced in recording actors' voices during the early 1930s, confirming the statement's accuracy.


 

9. Not Given


 

Reference

 

From paragraph: N/A

 


 

Explanation

 

The passage does not provide any information regarding intense competition between actors for contracts with the leading studios. Therefore, whether such competition existed or not is not addressed in the passage; hence, the answer is 'Not Given'.



 

10. True


 

Reference

 

From paragraph D: "Actors were bound to a single studio in seven-year contracts, and the studio boss generally held all the options."


 

 

Explanation

 

During Hollywood's Golden Age, studios exerted full control over actors' careers. Through long-term contracts and extensive publicity departments, studio executives dictated everything from roles to public image. Actors were bound to single studios and could be loaned out or given undesirable roles at the studio's discretion, underscoring the statement's validity about studios having total control over how their actors were perceived by the public.

 

 


To improve your vocabulary for the IELTS Reading section, read here.

Questions and Answers 11-13

  • Complete the summary below. Choose NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS from the passage for each answer.

 

 

THE HOLLYWOOD STUDIOS

 


Throughout its Golden Age, the Hollywood movie industry was controlled by a handful of studios. Using a system known as (11.)………………………………, the biggest studios not only made movies but handled their distribution and then finally showed them in their own theatres. These studios were often run by autocratic bosses – men known as (12.)…………………………………, who often remained at the head of organisations for decades. However, the domination of the industry by the leading studios came to an end in 1948, when they were forced to open the market to smaller producers – a process known as (13.)…………………………

 


 

The Hollywood Film Industry Reading Answers with Explanations (11-13)

 


 

Type of question: Summary completion

 

Under this task, you will be given a summary with incomplete sentences. However, you will not be given any list of words/phrases to choose the missing information. You must refer to the main passage to fill in the missing information. 

 

 

How to answer: 

 

  • Read the summary to understand what information it’s missing
  • Identify keywords and locate them in the main passage to find missing words 
  • Review the context of the words you’ve chosen to match the summary
  • Finalise your answers 



 

11. VERTICAL INTEGRATION


 

Reference

 

From paragraph C: "Vertical integration is the other key component in the rise of the Hollywood studio system. The major studios recognised that they could increase their profits by handling each stage of a film's life: production (making the film), distribution (getting the film out to people), and exhibition (owning the theatres in major cities where films were first shown)."

 


 

Explanation

 

 Vertical integration was pivotal as it enabled major studios to manage all aspects of filmmaking, from production to screening, ensuring maximum profit and market control. This strategy, implemented by 'The Big Five' studios, consolidated their power by dictating film distribution and exhibition terms, thereby solidifying their dominance during Hollywood's Golden Age.


 

12. MOVIE MOGULS


 

Reference

 

From paragraph D: "During the Golden Age, the studios were remarkably consistent and stable businesses, thanks in large part to long-term management heads - the infamous movie moguls' who ruled their kingdoms with iron fists."

 


 

Explanation

 

The term 'movie moguls' refers to influential leaders who led Hollywood studios, such as MGM and Warner Bros., for decades. These autocratic figures wielded significant control over both artistic decisions and business operations, ensuring stability and defining the studio system's era.


 

13. DIVESTITURE


 

Reference

 

From paragraph F: "In the United States versus Paramount federal decree of that year, the studios were ordered to give up their theatres in what is commonly referred to as 'divestiture' - opening the market to smaller producers."

 


 

Explanation

 

The term 'divestiture' refers to the mandated breakup of major studios' monopolistic control over film distribution and exhibition. This legal action, prompted by the 1948 Supreme Court decision, forced studios like Paramount to sell their theatre chains, thereby fostering competition from independent producers and reshaping Hollywood's business landscape.


 

 

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Q. Where can I find reliable IELTS Reading practice materials?

Ans. Reliable IELTS Reading practice materials can be found on official IELTS websites, reputable test preparation books, and online resources endorsed by experienced educators. Ensure the materials you use are up-to-date and aligned with the IELTS format and standards.

Q. How can I solve the IELTS reading fast?

Ans. To solve the IELTS Reading section quickly, focus on skimming and scanning techniques. Skim the passage first to get a general idea of the topic and main points. Then, scan for specific details relevant to each question without reading every word. Practise these techniques with timed exercises to improve speed and accuracy. Additionally, familiarise yourself with different question types to anticipate what information you need to find quickly.

Q. How can I get 8.0 in the IELTS reading?

Ans. Achieving an 8.0 band score in IELTS Reading requires a thorough understanding of the test format and effective strategies. Practise regularly with authentic IELTS practice tests to build familiarity with the types of questions and time management. Focus on improving your reading speed and comprehension by reading a variety of texts and articles. Pay attention to detail and practice answering questions under timed conditions to simulate exam conditions accurately.