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Advantages Of Public Transport Reading Answers: IELTS Reading Practice Test

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Updated on Jun 10, 2024, 11:48

In the IELTS Reading section, your reading comprehension skills are put to the test. This segment, lasting for 60 minutes, features three passages, each accompanied by a series of questions in formats like multiple choice, matching headings, and True/False/Not Given. Success here relies on your ability to grasp key information, discern main ideas, and infer meaning from context.

 

To excel in the IELTS Reading section, employ effective reading strategies such as skimming for main ideas and scanning for specific details. Regular practice with sample questions and exposure to different question types will hone your skills for test day.

 

Prepare for an insightful exploration of public transport's advantages, examining its benefits for individuals and communities alike. Engaging passages and accompanying questions will enrich your comprehension of this vital aspect of modern transportation by exploring its impact on urban mobility, environmental sustainability, and societal well-being.

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1. Advantages Of Public Transport Reading Passage

You should spend approximately 20 minutes answering Questions 1 - 14 based on the Reading Passage below. This approach can help manage time effectively during a reading comprehension activity or exam. 

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2. Advantages Of Public Transport Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Advantages Of Public Transport

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1.

Advantages Of Public Transport Reading Passage

General Information

  • Read Instructions: Understand each question before answering.
  • Manage Time: Spend about 20 minutes per passage.
  • Skim and Scan: Quickly get the main idea and find specific information.
  • Highlight Key Info: Underline essential words or phrases.
  • Answer All Questions: Attempt every question; no penalty for wrong answers.
  • Stay Focused: Avoid distractions and keep your attention on the task.
  • Check Spelling: Ensure correct spelling and grammar.
  • Transfer Answers Clearly: Write answers neatly on the answer sheet.
  • Don’t Dwell: Move on if stuck and return later.
  • Review: If time allows, review your answers.

 

 

 

 

 

Advantages of Public Transport


 

Paragraph 1

Public transport is more efficient than cars. A new study conducted by the Murdoch University's Institute for Science and Technology Policy (ISTP) for the World Bank has demonstrated this. The study compared the percentage of wealth poured into transport by 37 cities around the world. The public and private costs of building, maintaining and using a transport system was included.

 

Paragraph 2

The study says that the Western Australian city of Perth is a city with minimal public transport. As a result, 17% of its wealth is spent on transport costs. On the other hand, few European and Asian cities spent as little as 5%. ISTP Director and Professor Peter Newman, said that these more efficient cities were able to put the difference into attracting industry and jobs or creating a better place to live. 

 

Paragraph 3

According to Professor Newman, in comparison, the larger Australian city of Melbourne is a rather unusual city. He explains it as 2 cities: 'A European city surrounded by a car-dependent one'. Melbourne's large tram network has lowered the car use in the inner city. As most other Australian cities the outer suburbs have the same car-based structure. The increase in demand for accommodation in suburban Melbourne proposes a change in many people's choices as to where they live.

 

Paragraph 4

This is a new, broader way of considering public transport issues, says Newman. The case for public transport has been made in the past on the basis of environmental and social justice considerations rather than economics. However Newman believes that the study shows 'the auto-dependent city model is inefficient and not enough in economic as well as environmental terms'.

 

Paragraph 5

Even though bicycle use was not included in the study, Newman noted that the two most 'bicycle friendly' cities - Amsterdam and Copenhagen - were very efficient, even though their public transport systems were 'not special but reasonable'. 

 

Paragraph 6

The supporters of road networks reject the models of cities with good public transport by arguing that such systems would not work in that particular city. One objection is climate. Some people mentioned that they couldn't make proper use of public transport due to its extreme weather. Newman rejected this and said that public transport has been successful in both Toronto and Singapore and, in fact, he has checked the use of cars against climate and found 'zero correlation'.

 

Paragraph 7

Road lobbies are on stronger ground when it comes to other physical features. For example, for a city as hilly as Auckland it would be hard to develop a really good rail network, says Newman. He does note, however, that despite being hilly cities, both Hong Kong and Zurich have made a success of their heavy and light rail systems.

 

Paragraph 8

'The more democratic the process, the more public transportation is preferred,' Newman argues. He considers Portland, Oregon, a good example. Federal money was granted to build a new road a few years ago. However, local pressure groups instead wanted a referendum on whether to spend the funds on light rail. The rail idea was successful, and the railroad performed admirably. More rail systems were built in the years that followed, drastically altering the city's landscape. Portland has a similar population density to Perth, according to Newman. 

 

Paragraph 9

People avoided situations that forced them to spend more than half an hour travelling to work in the United Kingdom for at least 6 centuries. Trains and automobiles allowed people to live farther apart without having to travel longer distances. However, public infrastructure has not kept up with urbanisation, resulting in severe traffic congestion and much longer commute times.

 

Paragraph 10

There is a widespread belief that people who have more wealth are encouraged to live farther out where cars are the only useful transport. The example of European cities refutes that. They are richer than their American counterparts but do not have the same level of car use. Car use has actually fallen in Stockholm in recent years as the city has become larger and wealthier. This notion is made much more forcefully in a new study. Automobile use is higher in developing Asian cities like Jakarta and Bangkok than in wealthier Asian cities like Tokyo and Singapore. The World Bank and the Asian Development Bank prohibited the construction of public transportation in later-developing cities, forcing residents to rely on vehicles, resulting in huge traffic jams.

 

Paragraph 11

The Urban Village report, which used Melbourne as an example, Newman believes is one of the greatest studies on how cities constructed for cars may be transformed to rail use. It was discovered that forcing everyone into the city centre was not the most effective strategy. Instead, the proposal recommended the creation of urban villages at hundreds of sites, mostly around railway stations.

 

Paragraph 12

As people were no longer forced into cities, it was once assumed that improvements in telecommunications would lead to more dispersal in the population. The ISTP team's research, however, reveals that the population and job density of cities increased or stayed constant in the 1980s after decades of decline. The explanation for this is that it is valuable to place people working in related fields together. Our future world will mostly depend on the creativity of humans, and that flourishes where people come together face-to-face.'

2.

Advantages Of Public Transport Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Advantages Of Public Transport

Questions and Answers 1-5
  • Complete the notes below.
  • Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/ OR A NUMBER from the passage for each answer.

 

 

1. Public transport is more ________ than cars.

2. Murdoch University's (ISTP) conducted the study for the ________.

3. In ________ 17% of its wealth is spent on transport costs. 

4. On the other hand, few ________ and Asian cities spent as little as 5%.

5. Peter Newman is the Director of ________ and a Professor.

 

Advantages Of Public Transport  Answers with Explanations (1-5)

 

Type of question: Note Completion

 

In note completion questions, you are required to fill in the gaps in notes or summaries using information from the reading passage. This task assesses your ability to find specific details within the passage and requires you to understand and identify the main points. 

 

How to best answer the question

 

  • Understand what specific information you need to fill in the blanks.
  • Quickly read through the passage to get a general understanding of its main ideas, key points, and the context surrounding the information you need to complete.
  • Pay attention to keywords or phrases in the notes provided. 
  • Once you've identified the keywords, scan the passage to locate the section that contains the information needed to complete the notes. 
  • Be prepared for the information in the passage to be paraphrased or expressed using synonyms. 
  • Ensure that the completed notes fit logically within the context of the passage. 

 

 

1. Efficient

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 1

Public transport is more efficient than cars.
 

Explanation

The word "efficient" is taken directly from the line "Public transport is more efficient than cars," highlighting the efficiency of public transport compared to cars.


 

2. World Bank

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 1

A new study conducted by the Murdoch University's Institute for Science and Technology Policy (ISTP) for the World Bank has demonstrated this. 

 

Explanation

The phrase "for the World Bank" indicates that the study was conducted for the World Bank, as mentioned in the line "A new study conducted by the Murdoch University's Institute for Science and Technology Policy (ISTP) for the World Bank has demonstrated this."


 

3. Perth

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 2

The study says that the Western Australian city of Perth is a city with minimal public transport. 

 

Explanation

The city of Perth is specifically mentioned in the line "The study says that the Western Australian city of Perth is a city with minimal public transport," indicating that 17% of its wealth is spent on transport costs.


 

4. European

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 2

On the other hand, few European and Asian cities spent as little as 5%. 
 

Explanation

The word "European" refers to the cities mentioned in contrast to Perth, indicating that few European cities spent as little as 5%, as stated in the line "On the other hand, few European and Asian cities spent as little as 5%."


 

5. ISTP

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 2

ISTP Director and Professor Peter Newman, said that these more efficient cities were able to put the difference into attracting industry and jobs or creating a better place to live. 
 

Explanation

The acronym "ISTP" refers to the Murdoch University's Institute for Science and Technology Policy, as mentioned in the line "ISTP Director and Professor Peter Newman."

Questions and Answers 6-9
Do the following statements agree with the information given in the Reading Passage?
Based on your understanding of the passage, mark the statement:

  • YES if the statement agrees with the claims of the writer
  • NO f the statement contradicts the claims of the writer
  • NOT GIVEN if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

 

 

6. As the demand for accommodation inside suburban Melbourne increases, it changes many people's choice as to where they live.

7. Population and job density of cities decreased or stayed constant in the 1980s after decades of decline.

8. Forcing everyone into the city centre is not an effective strategy.

9. In Auckland it would be hard to develop a really good rail network.


 

Advantages Of Public Transport  Answers with Explanations (6-9)

 

Type of question: Agree/Disagree/Not Given

 

In this task, you are presented with a statement, and your task is to determine if it agrees with the information in the passage (Agree), contradicts the information in the passage (Disagree), or if there is insufficient information in the passage to decide (not given).

 

How to best answer:

 

  • Understand the missing information outlined in the summary.
  • Identify key terms and phrases from the summary in the main passage to locate the missing words.
  • Ensure that the words you select from the passage match the context provided in the summary.
  • Finalise your answers by confirming that the chosen words accurately complete the missing parts of the summary.


 

6. Yes

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 3

The increase in demand for accommodation in suburban Melbourne proposes a change in many people's choices as to where they live.
 

Explanation

This line from Paragraph 3 indicates that the increasing demand for accommodation in suburban Melbourne is influencing where people choose to live, directly supporting the statement.


 

7. No

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 12 

The ISTP team's research, however, reveals that the population and job density of cities increased or stayed constant in the 1980s after decades of decline.
 

Explanation

The line from Paragraph 12 clearly states that population and job density increased or stayed constant, contradicting the statement that they decreased.


 

8. Yes

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph  11

It was discovered that forcing everyone into the city centre was not the most effective strategy.
 

Explanation

The line from Paragraph 11 explicitly states that forcing everyone into the city centre is not an effective strategy, confirming the statement.


 

9. Yes

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 7 

For example, for a city as hilly as Auckland it would be hard to develop a really good rail network, says Newman.

 

Explanation

This line from Paragraph 7 explains that Auckland's hilly terrain makes it difficult to develop a good rail network, supporting the statement.

Questions and Answers 10-14
  • Complete the notes below.
  • Choose NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBERS from the passage for each answer.

 

 

10. Melbourne's large ________ network has lowered the car use in the inner city. 

11. The case for public transport has been made in the past on the basis of environmental and social justice considerations rather than ________.

12. Amsterdam and _______ were very efficient, even though their public transport systems were 'not special but reasonable'. 

13. The supporters of ___________ reject the models of cities with good public transport by arguing that such systems would not work in that particular city. 

14. The World Bank and the Asian Development Bank prohibited the construction of public transportation in later-developing cities, forcing residents to rely on ________, resulting in huge traffic jams.

 

 

Advantages Of Public Transport  Answers with Explanations (10-14)

 

Type of question: Sentence Completion

 

To answer sentence completion questions accurately, read the given sentence carefully and identify the missing word or phrase. Then, consider the context to determine the most suitable answer option that completes the sentence appropriately. Choosing the option that best fits the context will help you answer sentence completion questions accurately.

 

How to best answer the question

 

  • Carefully read the incomplete sentence and try to understand what information is missing.
  • Pay attention to the context and any clues provided in the sentence or the surrounding text.
  • Choose the option that best completes the sentence based on the information from the reading passage.

 

 

10. Tram

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 3

Melbourne's large tram network has lowered the car use in the inner city.
 

Explanation

The line from Paragraph 3 states that Melbourne's large tram network has reduced car use in the inner city.


 

11. Economics

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 4 

The case for public transport has been made in the past on the basis of environmental and social justice considerations rather than economics.
 

Explanation

The line from Paragraph 4 indicates that public transport has historically been justified by environmental and social justice considerations rather than economic ones.


 

12. Copenhagen

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 5 

Even though bicycle use was not included in the study, Newman noted that the two most 'bicycle friendly' cities - Amsterdam and Copenhagen - were very efficient, even though their public transport systems were 'not special but reasonable'.
 

Explanation

The line from Paragraph 5 mentions Amsterdam and Copenhagen as efficient cities despite their reasonable but not special public transport systems.


 

13. Road networks

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 6 

The supporters of road networks reject the models of cities with good public transport by arguing that such systems would not work in that particular city.
 

Explanation

The line from Paragraph 6 states that supporters of road networks argue against models of cities with good public transport.


 

14. Vehicles

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 10 

The World Bank and the Asian Development Bank prohibited the construction of public transportation in later-developing cities, forcing residents to rely on vehicles, resulting in huge traffic jams.
 

Explanation

The line from Paragraph 10 indicates that these banks prohibited public transportation construction, leading residents to depend on vehicles.

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FAQs

Q. What are some common misconceptions about the IELTS Reading test?

Ans. Common misconceptions include the belief that you need to understand every word in the passage, read the entire passage thoroughly, or that the questions are always straightforward. In reality, you can use skimming and scanning strategies, and questions often require critical thinking and inference.

Q. Are there any specific resources recommended for improving reading skills for the IELTS?

Ans. Yes, use resources such as Project Gutenberg for classic literature, Medium for contemporary articles, and apps like Kindle or Goodreads for a variety of reading materials. Practice comprehension exercises on websites like Khan Academy and Newsela to improve your reading proficiency.

Q. How important is vocabulary in the IELTS Reading test?

Ans. Vocabulary is crucial in the IELTS Reading test as it helps you understand the passage and answer questions accurately. Focus on learning academic and topic-specific vocabulary, and practice using context clues to deduce the meaning of unfamiliar.