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The Swiffer Reading Answers: IELTS Reading Practice Test

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Updated on Jul 08, 2024, 12:48

In the IELTS Reading section, your reading comprehension skills are rigorously tested. Lasting for 60 minutes, this segment comprises three passages, each accompanied by a series of questions in various formats like multiple choice, matching headings, and True/False/Not Given. Success in this section hinges on your ability to grasp key information, discern main ideas, and infer meaning from context.

 

To ace the IELTS Reading section, adopt effective reading strategies such as skimming for main ideas and scanning for specific details. Regular practice with sample questions and exposure to different question types will sharpen your skills for test day.


 

Prepare for an enlightening exploration of "The Swiffer Reading Answers," an insightful look into the development and significance of this innovative cleaning tool. Delve into the invention, technological advancements, and market impact of the Swiffer through engaging passages and accompanying questions, enriching your understanding of how this simple yet revolutionary product has transformed household cleaning and maintenance.

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1. The Swiffer Reading Passage

You should spend approximately 20 minutes answering Questions 1 - 13 based on the Reading Passage below. This approach can help manage time effectively during a reading comprehension activity or exam. 


 

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2. The Swiffer Reading Answers Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about The Swiffer Reading Answers

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1.

The Swiffer Reading Passage

General Information

  • Read Instructions: Understand each question before answering.
  • Manage Time: Spend about 20 minutes per passage.
  • Skim and Scan: Quickly get the main idea and find specific information.
  • Highlight Key Info: Underline essential words or phrases.
  • Answer All Questions: Attempt every question; no penalty for wrong answers.
  • Stay Focused: Avoid distractions and keep your attention on the task.
  • Check Spelling: Ensure correct spelling and grammar.
  • Transfer Answers Clearly: Write answers neatly on the answer sheet.
  • Don’t Dwell: Move on if stuck and return later.
  • Review: If time allows, review your answers.

 

 

The Swiffer Reading Passage 

 

 

Paragraph A 

 

Writer Jonah Lehrer recommends examining the history of the Swiffer cleaning product for an interesting story about creativity. In the narrative of the Swiffer, he says, we see the essential ingredients for generating breakthrough ideas: irritation, moments of clarity, and sheer effort. The narrative begins with a global corporation that produced tools for keeping houses pristine but could not come up with new ways to clean floors. As a result, the firm employed designers to observe how people cleaned.

 

Paragraph B

 

After several weeks of study, they saw a woman using a paper towel to do what everyone else does: wipe something clean and dispose of it. As conceived by chief designer Harry West, the remedy to their difficulty was a floor mop with something like a disposable wiping surface. After years of effort and mountains of prototypes, they introduced the Swiffer, which became an instant commercial hit.

 

Paragraph C

 

Lehrer the writer of Imagine, a new book that aims to explain how creativity functions, explains that this study of the imagination began with a desire to comprehend what occurs in the brain at the instant of unexpected revelation. But the book spun out of control, according to Lehrer. When you speak with creative individuals, they will talk about the "eureka" moment, but if you press them, they will also talk about the subsequent hard work, so I realised I wanted to write about it as well. Then I realised I could not examine creativity just from the standpoint of the brain since it is also dependent on culture and environment, the group, the team, and how we cooperate.

 

Paragraph D

 

Lehrer asserts that current neuroscience has offered a 'rough draft' explanation of what is occurring in the brain with regard to the enigmatic process by which inspiration appears seemingly out of nowhere. He describes how, in 1965, the exhausted American musician Bob Dylan intended to abandon his musical career and flee to a cabin in the woods, only to be overtaken by the urge to write. Evidently, he wrote "Like a Rolling Stone" all of a sudden. Dylan allegedly stated that it's as if a ghost is crafting a song. It delivers you the song and then disappears. Lehrer asserts that it is not a ghost.

 

Paragraph E

 

Instead, the right part of the brain is connecting historical influences to create something wholly original. By imaging the brains of people who solve word puzzles by making sense of distantly connected information, neuroscientists have roughly mapped this process. For instance, subjects are asked to think of a single word that can come before or come after each of three words, such as "age," "mile," and "sand," to create a compound word.

 

Paragraph F

 

(It just so happens to be stone) The anterior superior temporal gyrus, a small tissue fold, is suddenly illuminated just before people appear to have the answer in an evident flash of insight, according to research using brain imaging equipment. When the word puzzle is correctly decoded through careful analysis, this remains silent. According to Lehrer, this region of the brain only becomes active after we have reached a dead end with a problem. Then, in order to create the connections that result in the correct response, the brain begins searching through the "filing cabinets of the right hemisphere."

 

Paragraph G

 

Studies have shown that it is possible to anticipate an epiphanic moment up to eight seconds in advance. The alpha waves, which are strongly correlated with relaxing activities, are the predictive signal, and they are produced by the right hemisphere of the brain. According to Lehrer, when our minds are relaxed, and our brains are producing alpha waves, we are more likely to focus our attention on the stream of distant associations coming from the right hemisphere. In contrast, our attention tends to be drawn to the specifics of the issues we are attempting to solve when we are diligently focused.

 

Paragraph H

 

Consequently, we are less likely to form those crucial associations. Therefore, taking a walk or taking a nap are crucial stages of the creative process, and astute businesses are aware of this. Some companies now encourage employees to take breaks during the workday and engage in activities that may seem unproductive (like playing video games on a computer), but daydreaming has been found to be positively correlated with problem-solving. Lehrer notes that in order to be more creative, it's also important to work with people from a variety of backgrounds because creativity is stifled when coworkers are too socially close.

 

Paragraph I

 

It seems that serendipity is essential to creativity. American businessman Steve Jobs held this view. Lehrer explains how Jobs planned Pixar Animation's entire workplace to increase the likelihood of strangers running into one another, striking up conversations, and sharing knowledge. He also cites research on 766 business graduates who later founded their own businesses. People who had the most acquaintances were much more successful. Lehrer claims to have considered all of this and, in spite of his natural shyness, makes an effort to strike up conversations with strangers when they are seated next to him on a plane or at a conference.

 

Paragraph J

 

In contrast to predictions that the growth of the Internet would render the need for shared workspace obsolete, according to Lehrer, research demonstrates that when people have conversations in person, creativity is increased. This is why the environment in which we live has a significant impact on innovation. Theoretical physicist Geoffrey West claims that as corporate institutions grow larger, they frequently become less open to change. However, cities foster the growth of our inventiveness by bringing a diverse range of people together to share ideas. It may be convenient to work from home, but it seems that our best "eureka" moments require interaction with other people.

2.

The Swiffer Reading Answers Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about The Swiffer

Questions and Answers 1-4
  • The Swiffer Reading Answers Questions (1-4)

    • Choose the correct option A-D

     

     

     

      1. The time when Jonah Lehrer started writing his book,

     

    A. He had no intention to focus on creativity.

    B. He ended up revising his plans for the content.

    C. He was working in an extremely creative environment.

    D. He was amused by his experience of ‘eureka’ moment

     

     

    2. What is known about the "swiffer" product?

     

    A. Its creators lacked prior experience creating household items.

    B. It took very little time to develop once the concept for it was conceived.

    C. it outperformed the manufacturer's expectations in terms of profits.

    D. Its design was influenced by a typical household routine.

     

     

    3. Lehrer makes reference to Bob Dylan as a singer in order to,

     

    A. shows how concepts seem to come to you on their own.

    B. illustrates how we might be able to be less creative.

    C. Compare various methods for provoking the imagination.

    D. suggests specific methods for regaining lost creativity.

     

     

    4. What was learned from the word puzzle experiment by neuroscientists?

     

    A. When memories are more meaningful, they are simpler to recall.

    B. It's not always effective to solve problems analytically.

    C. A connection only triggers one part of the brain to become active.

    D. People who are creative typically approach language puzzles more instinctively.

     

     

    The Swiffer Reading Answers Reading Answers with Explanations (1-4)

     

     

    Question Type: Multiple Choice 

     

    Multiple Choice questions in the IELTS reading test present you with a question followed by a set of options from which you must choose the correct answer. Typically, there are three or four options to choose from. You must carefully read the question and each option before selecting the correct answer.


     

    How to best answer this question:

     

    • You must comprehend the passage to select the most accurate option.
    • Efficient skimming and scanning help locate relevant information quickly.
    • Some options may be designed to mislead you, so it's crucial to base your choice on evidence from the passage.
    • Multiple-choice questions can be time-consuming if you dwell on each option too long. 
    • Manage your time wisely to ensure you can attempt all questions.


     

    1. B. He ended up revising his plans for the content.

     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph C 

    But the book spun out of control, according to Lehrer.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph C indicates that Lehrer had to revise his plans for the book's content.


     

    2. D. Its design was influenced by a typical household routine.


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph A 

    In the narrative of the Swiffer, he says, we see the essential ingredients for generating breakthrough ideas: irritation, moments of clarity, and sheer effort.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph A describes how the design of the Swiffer was influenced by observing typical household routines.


     

    3. A. shows how concepts seem to come to you on their own.


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph D 

    Dylan allegedly stated that it's as if a ghost is crafting a song.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph D shows how concepts seem to come to you on their own, as illustrated by Bob Dylan's experience.


     

    4. C. A connection only triggers one part of the brain to become active.


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph

    By imaging the brains of people who solve word puzzles by making sense of distantly connected information, neuroscientists have roughly mapped this process.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph E indicates that the process of connecting information triggers a specific part of the brain to become active.


     

    Read more about Dictation Words for IELTS: Practice and Preparation!

     

    Questions and Answers 5-8

    • Complete each sentence with the correct ending, A-G, below.
    • Write the correct letter, A-G, in boxes 5-8 on your answer sheet.

     

     

    A. Whenever there is a lack of familiarity between parties.
    B. because the right side of the brain is more active than the left.
    C. If a problem's specifics are the focus of attention.
    D. to improve their chances of finding solutions.
    E. when people lack the necessary problem-solving experience.
    F. when there are obvious signs of distraction in the brain.
    G. when the brain's two hemispheres are active

     

     

    5. Scientists anticipate a breakthrough moment.
    6. Making mental connections is much more difficult.
    7. Some businesses demand that their employees take time off.
    8. A team will work more effectively.

     

     

    The Swiffer Reading Answers Reading Answers with Explanations (5-8)

     

     

    Type of question: Matching Features

     

    In the task of "Matching Features," you typically need to pair related items based on certain criteria. This could involve comparing characteristics, identifying connections, or linking items that complement each other. The specific approach will depend on the task's context. 


     

    How to best answer the question

     

    • Start by identifying the key aspects of each item and then clearly demonstrate how they align or differ. 
    • Providing specific examples or evidence to support your comparisons can strengthen your answer. 
    • It's also essential to ensure that your response is organised and easy to follow, so consider using a structured format such as a table or a side-by-side comparison.


     

     

    5. B

     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph E 

    By imaging the brains of people who solve word puzzles by making sense of distantly connected information, neuroscientists have roughly mapped this process.

     

     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph E indicates that the right side of the brain is active during moments of insight, supporting the idea that scientists anticipate a breakthrough moment.


     

    6. C


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph  G 

    In contrast, our attention tends to be drawn to the specifics of the issues we are attempting to solve when we are diligently focused.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph G explains that focusing on a problem's specifics makes it harder to form mental connections.


     

    7. D

     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph H 

    Some companies now encourage employees to take breaks during the workday and engage in activities that may seem unproductive (like playing video games on a computer), but daydreaming has been found to be positively correlated with problem-solving.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph H describes how businesses encourage breaks to improve employees' chances of finding solutions.


     

    8. A


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph H 

    Lehrer notes that in order to be more creative, it's also important to work with people from a variety of backgrounds because creativity is stifled when coworkers are too socially close.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph H highlights that a lack of familiarity between team members can enhance creativity and effectiveness.


     

    Read more about A Guide on Most Common English Words Used in Daily Life!

    Questions and Answers 9-13

    • Complete the notes below.
    • Choose ONE WORD ONLY from the passage for each answer.
    • Write your answers in boxes, 9-13 on your reading answer sheet.

     

     

    How other people influence our creativity

     

     

    STEVE JOBS: made changes to the (9) ……………………… to encourage interaction at Pixar.
    LEHRER: company owners must have a wide range of (10) ……………………… to do well. It’s important to start (11) ……………………… with new people.
    the (12) ……………………… has not replaced the need for physical contact.
    GEOFFREY WEST: living in (13) ……………………… encourages creativity.

     

     

    The Swiffer Reading Answers Reading Answers with Explanations (9-13)

     

     

    Type of question: Note Completion

     

    In note completion questions, you are required to fill in the gaps in notes or summaries using information from the reading passage. This task assesses your ability to find specific details within the passage and requires you to understand and identify the main points. 


     

    How to best answer the question

     

    • Understand what specific information you need to fill in the blanks.
    • Quickly read through the passage to understand its main ideas, key points, and the context surrounding the information you need to complete.
    • Pay attention to keywords or phrases in the notes provided. 
    • Once you've identified the keywords, scan the passage to locate the section that contains the information needed to complete the notes. 
    • Be prepared for the information in the passage to be paraphrased or expressed using synonyms. 
    • Ensure that the completed notes fit logically within the context of the passage. 


     

    9. Workplace


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph  I 

    Jobs planned Pixar Animation's entire workplace to increase the likelihood of strangers running into one another, striking up conversations, and sharing knowledge.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph I shows how Steve Jobs made changes to the workplace to encourage interaction.


     

    10. Acquaintances


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph I 

    People who had the most acquaintances were much more successful.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph I indicates that having a wide range of acquaintances is important for success, according to Lehrer.


     

    11. Conversations


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph  I 

    makes an effort to strike up conversations with strangers when they are seated next to him on a plane or at a conference.


     

    Explanation


    This line from Paragraph I highlights the importance of starting conversations with new people.


     

    12. Internet


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph J 

    In contrast to predictions that the growth of the Internet would render the need for shared workspace obsolete...


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph J explains that the internet has not replaced the need for physical contact.


     

    13. Cities


     

    Reference:

     

    Paragraph J 

    However, cities foster the growth of our inventiveness by bringing a diverse range of people together to share ideas.


     

    Explanation

     

    This line from Paragraph J indicates that living in cities encourages creativity.


     

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    FAQs

    Q. Which part of IELTS reading is most difficult?

    Ans. The difficulty of the IELTS Reading test varies for each individual, but many candidates find the Academic Reading test more challenging than the General Training Reading test. This is mainly because Academic Reading passages are typically more dense and complex, requiring a higher level of comprehension and a broader vocabulary.


     

    Q. How can I get an 8.5 on the IELTS reading?

    Ans. To achieve an 8.5 in IELTS Reading, engage in rigorous practice with authentic test materials to boost your reading speed and accuracy. Master skimming and scanning techniques to quickly locate key information. Enhance your vocabulary and comprehension skills by regularly reading academic texts and articles. Lastly, practice under exam conditions to effectively manage time and build confidence.

    Q. Can we switch between sections in the IELTS reading?

    Ans. No, you cannot switch between sections in the IELTS Reading test. Once you start a section, you must complete all questions in that section before moving to the next. Efficient time management within each section is crucial as you cannot return to previous sections once you have moved forward. This format assesses your ability to handle different reading tasks within a set timeframe.