leap-scholar-logo
hamburger-menu

Space Reading Answers: IELTS Reading Practice Test

updated at

Updated on Jul 15, 2024, 10:34

The IELTS Reading section is designed to assess your reading comprehension skills through a series of passages and questions. This section includes three long texts taken from books, magazines, journals, and newspapers. The passages are of varying difficulty and cover various topics, allowing you to demonstrate your ability to understand detailed information, infer meanings, and identify the main ideas.

 

 

You will have 60 minutes to answer 40 questions in the reading module. The types of questions you will encounter include multiple-choice, identifying information, matching headings, and sentence completion. Practising time management and developing effective reading strategies is crucial to succeed in this section.

 

 

For instance, in a passage about space, you might read about the latest discoveries in astronomy, the challenges of space travel, or the potential for life on other planets. Such topics test your ability to grasp complex information and your capacity to interpret scientific data and understand technical terms.


 

On this page

Arrow right
Slider image

1. Space Reading Passage

You should spend approximately 20 minutes answering Questions 1 - 14 based on the Reading Passage below. This approach can help manage time effectively during a reading comprehension activity or exam.

Slider image

2. Space Reading Questions & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Space Reading Question & Answers

More for you

Boost your IELTS Reading score

Book Free Reading class arrow right

See how to score 8+ in Speaking. 

 

Get proven strategies to ace your IELTS Speaking test.

Learn More arrow right
3/3
1.

Space Reading Passage

General Information

  • Read Instructions: Understand each question before answering.
  • Manage Time: Spend about 20 minutes per passage.
  • Skim and Scan: Quickly get the main idea and find specific information.
  • Highlight Key Info: Underline essential words or phrases.
  • Answer All Questions: Attempt every question; no penalty for wrong answers.
  • Stay Focused: Avoid distractions and keep your attention on the task.
  • Check Spelling: Ensure correct spelling and grammar.
  • Transfer Answers Clearly: Write answers neatly on the answer sheet.
  • Don’t Dwell: Move on if stuck and return later.
  • Review: If time allows, review your answers.

 

 

 

 

Space Reading Passage

 

 

Paragraph A: In his book "An Essay on the Principle of Population," which was published in 1798, Thomas Malthus projected that by the middle of the 1800s, the unregulated rise of the human population would overflow the farming land that was necessary to feed humanity. A great deal has transpired since then. Since this purported turning point that occurred more than 150 years ago, humankind has continued to advance despite being considerably more constrained.

 

 

Paragraph B: Unrestrained population increase is obvious. Urbanisation is a more visible worldwide phenomenon than before as more people migrate from rural areas to cities like Tokyo, Mexico City, and Mumbai in search of a better living. Megacities with more than 10 million inhabitants are cropping up on every continent. Now overpopulated, they're eager for land. The expanding human population is fueling a voracious need for real estate despite advances in agricultural technology. Personal, public, corporate, national, human, and flora/fauna space is at a premium in the next century. They are desperate for one resource that is becoming more valuable: land and the human population is now at an all-time high. More land is needed for a variety of infrastructure facilities in addition to housing. While advances in agricultural technology mean humanity may be able to feed the people thronging to these huge metropolises, an unparalleled thirst for real estate is being fueled by the growth of the human race. Green pastures are turned into airports, and virgin forests are cleared for food and firewood. In poorer locations, newly exposed land becomes desert, completing the destruction cycle.

 

 

Paragraph C: The most popular way to use pricey space for living and working has been to build upwards; therefore, the a desire for ever-taller apartments and commercial buildings in big cities like New York, Shanghai, and Singapore. The British Library, which houses millions of books, was built entirely underground not only for transportation networks but also for garbage storage, book depositories, etc. in London. The global building has become more innovative in recent years. Many countries, including Holland and the UK, have restored marshes and floodplains. Like Venice, Italy, housing complexes and airports have been built off-shore. In Japan, Kansai International Airport was built on a man-made island at great expense. In Dubai, a very inventive and expensive palm tree-shaped housing complex is being developed close to the shoreline. Global warming's rising sea levels threaten these and other developments.

 

 

Paragraph D: But when Earth is at capacity, where will humanity go? Numerous theories have been put up regarding the expansion of the human population into space. Marshall Savage, for instance, predicted that by the year 3000, there would be five quintillion people living throughout the solar system, with the majority of them residing in the asteroid belt. Savage's ardent admirer, Arthur C. Clarke currently asserts that humanity will be present on the Moon, Mars, Europa, Ganymede, and Titan, and in orbits around Venus, Neptune, and Pluto by the year 2057. According to Freeman Dyson, the Kuiper belt could become the future home of humanity within a few generations.

 

Paragraph E: Huge space stations with human habitation are now a possibility rather than simply a pipe dream. The planet is currently orbited by a permanent multinational space station. Recently, the first commercial tourist visited the space, and additional trips are scheduled for the near future. Although this is just the beginning, space hotels are soon to be built. Where humanity may end up is unknown. Though I'm sure, I'm not the only one who fantasises about spending my summer vacations on a floating hotel in the Andromeda nebula or on a distant planet watching the moons rise, the concepts of the off-world settlement are not outlandish.

 

2.

Space Reading Questions & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Space

Questions and Answers 1-5
Do the following statements agree with the claims of the writer in Reading Passage?
In boxes 1-5 on your answer sheet, write

  • YES if the statement reflects the claims of the writer
  • NO if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer
  • NOT GIVEN i if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

 

  1. The concept of the habitation of outer space by mankind is unimaginable.
  2. The destruction of land for food and firewood is linked to desertification.
  3. Arthur C Clarke was the only person to predict that mankind would inhabit other parts of the solar system.
  4. The shortage of space has also led to the construction of underground buildings.
  5. The building of the airport in Japan costs much more than that of the housing complex in Dubai.


 

Space Reading Answers with Explanations 1-5

 

 

Type of Question: Yes/No/Not Given


 

These types of questions involve finding whether the given statement is Yes/No/Not Given based on the given paragraph. 
 

How to best answer: 


 

  • Understand the statement given in the question before looking for the answer in the passage.
  • Identify and underline keywords in the statement to help you find the relevant part of the passage quickly.
  • Ensure that the information in the passage directly supports or contradicts the statement; don't rely solely on matching words.

 

  • Identify the Correct Response:

 

  • Yes: If the statement agrees with the information in the passage.
  • No: If the statement contradicts the information in the passage.
  • Not Given: If there is no information about the statement in the passage.
  • Avoid bringing in outside knowledge or personal opinions; base your answers solely on the passage content.

 

 

1. No

 

Reference: From Paragraph E, "Huge space stations with human habitation are now a possibility rather than simply a pipe dream."

 

Explanation: The paragraph clearly states that human habitation in space is now considered a realistic possibility, which contradicts the statement that it is unimaginable. This shows that advancements have made space habitation conceivable and potentially feasible in the near future.
 

 

2. Yes

 

Reference: From Paragraph B, "In poorer locations, newly exposed land becomes desert, completing the destruction cycle."

 

 

Explanation: The paragraph explicitly connects the destruction of land for food and firewood to desertification, indicating that once the land is cleared and exposed, it eventually turns into desert, thus completing the cycle of destruction and linking the two processes directly.


 

3. No

 

 

Reference: From Paragraph D, "Arthur C. Clarke currently asserts that humanity will be present on the Moon, Mars, Europa, Ganymede, and Titan, and in orbits around Venus, Neptune, and Pluto by the year 2057."

 

Explanation: The paragraph mentions Arthur C. Clarke's predictions but also references Marshall Savage and Freeman Dyson, who have made similar forecasts about human habitation in the solar system. This indicates that Clarke is not the only person with such predictions, thus contradicting the statement.

 

4. Yes

 

 

Reference: From Paragraph C, "The British Library, which houses millions of books, was built entirely underground not only for transportation networks but also for garbage storage, book depositories, etc."

 

Explanation: The paragraph details the construction of the British Library and other facilities underground due to space constraints. This indicates that the shortage of space on the surface has necessitated the development of underground buildings, supporting the statement.

 

 

5. Not given

 

 

Reference: N/A

 

Explanation: The passage does not provide any comparative information regarding the costs of building the airport in Japan and the housing complex in Dubai. Since there is no data or mention of cost comparisons, it is impossible to determine whether the statement is true or false, making the answer "Not given."

 

IELTS Reading Tips & Tricks 2024: Techniques for Band 9



 

Questions and Answers 6-9
  • Reading passage 1 has five sections A - E. Choose the correct heading for sections B - E from the list of headings below.

 

List of Headings

i.    How the problem of land scarcity has been overcome in the past
ii.   Various predictions about future solutions to a lack of space
iii.   The effects of population growth on land availability
iv.   The importance of the new British Library
v.    An expanding population
vi.   A description of a mega-city
vii.  A firm belief that human habitation of outer space will occur
viii. The importance of having an international space station


 

Space Reading Answers with Explanations 6-9

 

Type of Question: Matching Heading


 

To answer Matching heading questions in IELTS reading, identify specific features or characteristics mentioned in the passage and match them with the corresponding headings provided in the question.


 

How to best answer: 


 

  • Quickly read through the passage to get an overall understanding of the content and main ideas.
  • Focus on each paragraph's main idea or theme rather than specific details.
  • Compare the key themes you identified with the list of headings provided, looking for the best fit.
  • Cross out headings that clearly do not match any part of the passage to narrow down your choices.
  • Be cautious of similar headings; carefully differentiate between them to choose the most accurate match for each paragraph.

 

6. iii


 

Reference: From Paragraph B, "The expanding human population is fueling a voracious need for real estate, despite advances in agricultural technology."

 

Explanation: Paragraph B discusses the significant impact of population growth on land availability. As more people move to urban areas, the demand for real estate increases, leading to the conversion of green spaces into urban developments. This process exacerbates issues like land scarcity and environmental degradation, highlighting the direct correlation between population growth and the need for more land.

 

 

7. i


 

Reference: From Paragraph C, "The global building has become more innovative in recent years."

 

Explanation: Paragraph C focuses on innovative solutions to address land scarcity issues. It discusses how advancements in building technologies, such as constructing upwards and developing off-shore complexes, have been employed to maximise limited land resources. This demonstrates historical and contemporary approaches to managing land scarcity challenges through creative urban planning and architectural innovations.

 

 

8. ii

 

Reference: From Paragraph D, "Numerous theories have been put up regarding the expansion of the human population into space."

 

Explanation: Paragraph D presents various speculative theories and predictions concerning humanity's potential expansion into space. It mentions predictions by Marshall Savage and Arthur C. Clarke about future human habitation on celestial bodies within the solar system. This aligns with the heading "Various predictions about future solutions to a lack of space," as it explores futuristic ideas to address the challenges posed by Earth's limited space and resources.


 

9. vii

 

Reference: From Paragraph E, "Recently, the first commercial tourist visited the space, and additional trips are scheduled soon. Although this is just the beginning, space hotels are soon to be built."

 

 

Explanation: Paragraph E expresses confidence in the feasibility of human habitation in outer space. It discusses recent advancements in space tourism and plans for constructing space hotels, indicating a growing belief and investment in the idea of humans living beyond Earth. This aligns with the heading "A firm belief that human habitation of outer space will occur," as it portrays optimism and active development towards expanding human presence beyond our planet.


Also See: IELTS Academic 2024 Reading Resources

 

Questions and Answers 10-13
  • Complete the sentences below. Choose NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS from the passage for each answer.

 

 

10.  The movement of rural people to cities is a _______
11.  The land is now very _______, as a result of the growing demand for space.
12.  The feeding of the human race will perhaps be guaranteed by changes in _______
13.  Besides the demands of accommodation, the land is needed for various _______


 

Space Reading Answers with Explanations 10-13

 

 

Type of Question: Sentence Completion


 

To answer Sentence Completion questions in IELTS reading, carefully read the given sentence or incomplete statement, identify the missing information or word, and then locate the relevant information in the passage that completes or fills in the blank accurately.


 

How to best answer: 


 

  • Ensure you understand the instructions and the word limit for each blank.
  • Identify keywords in the incomplete sentences to help locate the relevant information in the passage.
  • Quickly find the section of the passage that discusses the keywords or main idea.
  • Use the exact words or phrases from the passage to fill in the blanks, ensuring grammatical accuracy.
  • Ensure the completed sentence makes sense both grammatically and contextually within the passage.

 

 

10. Worldwide phenomenon

 

 

Reference: From Paragraph B, "Urbanisation is a more visible worldwide phenomenon than before as more people migrate from rural areas to cities like Tokyo, Mexico City, and Mumbai in search of a better living."

 

 

Explanation: This statement highlights urbanization as a significant global trend where populations are increasingly moving from rural to urban areas across the globe. The reference indicates that this phenomenon is observable on a global scale, impacting cities worldwide.


 

11. Infrastructure facilities

 

Reference: From Paragraph B, "More land is needed for a variety of infrastructure facilities in addition to housing."

 

 

Explanation: The passage discusses the necessity for land to accommodate not only residential areas but also essential infrastructure such as roads, utilities, and other public amenities. This reflects the broader demand for land for urban development purposes beyond housing alone.


 

12. Agriculture technology

 

Reference: From Paragraph B, "While advances in agricultural technology mean humanity may be able to feed the people thronging to these huge metropolises..."

 

 

Explanation: This reference underscores how advancements in agricultural technology are crucial in ensuring food security for rapidly growing urban populations. It suggests that technological innovations in farming could potentially mitigate the challenges posed by increased urbanisation and the need for more food production.


 

13. Real estate

 

 

Reference: From Paragraph B, "They are desperate for one resource that is becoming more valuable: land, and the human population is now at an all-time high."

 

Explanation: This line emphasises the escalating value of land due to high demand for real estate driven by population growth. It suggests that land is increasingly viewed as a valuable resource, essential not only for housing but also for commercial and industrial development in urban areas.

 

Read more:
 

Next Up

IELTS Reading Practice Test

Read Now Read now

IELTS Speaking Practice Test

Read Now Read now

IELTS Practice Test

Read Now Read now

IELTS Listening Practice Test

Read Now Read now

IELTS Writing Practice Test

Read Now Read now

IELTS Important Information

IELTS Accepting Countries

IELTS Accepting Universities

Read More about IELTS Practice Test

Top Reading Samples with Answers

IELTS Test Centre and Dates in India

FAQs

Q. How is the IELTS Reading test scored?

Ans. The IELTS Reading test is scored based on the number of correct answers. Each correct answer earns one point, and there is no negative marking for incorrect answers. Scores are reported in whole and half bands ranging from 0 to 9. The final score is an average of the scores for the four sections of the test (Reading, Writing, Listening, and Speaking).

Q. What are some effective reading strategies for the IELTS Reading test?

Ans. Effective strategies for the IELTS Reading test include skimming and scanning to quickly grasp the main idea and locate specific information, reading questions before the passage to focus on key details, and managing time to ensure completion of all tasks. Additionally, paraphrasing and understanding the structure of different question types (such as multiple-choice or True/False/Not Given) can enhance comprehension and accuracy.


 

Q. Can I use a highlighter or take notes during the IELTS Reading test?

Ans. No, candidates are not allowed to use highlighters or take notes during the IELTS Reading test. They must read and answer questions directly on the question paper. However, candidates can underline or circle key information on the question paper to aid their understanding and focus. It's important to manage time effectively since there is no additional time given for transferring answers to the answer sheet.