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Saving Language Reading Answers: IELTS Reading Practice Test

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Updated on Jun 11, 2024, 07:03

In the IELTS Reading section, your reading comprehension skills are tested. Lasting for 60 minutes, this segment comprises three passages, each accompanied by a series of questions spanning various formats like multiple choice, matching headings, and True/False/Not Given. Success here hinges on your ability to grasp key information, discern main ideas, and infer meaning from context.
 

To ace the IELTS Reading section, adopt effective reading strategies such as skimming for main ideas and scanning for specific details. Regular practice with sample questions and exposure to different question types will sharpen your skills for test day.
 

Prepare for an enlightening exploration of "Saving Language," an insightful look into the efforts and challenges involved in preserving endangered languages. Delve into the significance of linguistic diversity, the strategies employed to save dying languages, and the cultural implications of language loss through engaging passages and accompanying questions, enriching your understanding of this crucial aspect of human heritage.

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1. Saving Language Reading Passage

You should spend approximately 20 minutes answering Questions 1 - 13 based on the Reading Passage below. This approach can help manage time effectively during a reading comprehension activity or exam. 

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2. Saving Language Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Saving Language

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1.

Saving Language Reading Passage

General Information

  • Read Instructions: Understand each question before answering.
  • Manage Time: Spend about 20 minutes per passage.
  • Skim and Scan: Quickly get the main idea and find specific information.
  • Highlight Key Info: Underline essential words or phrases.
  • Answer All Questions: Attempt every question; no penalty for wrong answers.
  • Stay Focused: Avoid distractions and keep your attention on the task.
  • Check Spelling: Ensure correct spelling and grammar.
  • Transfer Answers Clearly: Write answers neatly on the answer sheet.
  • Don’t Dwell: Move on if stuck and return later.
  • Review: If time allows, review your answers.

 

 

 

 

Saving Language Reading Passage


 

 

Paragraph A

The demise of a single language is not unusual. Throughout history, communities have come and gone, taking their language with them. By the standards of the past, however, what is occurring right now is extraordinary. It represents the widespread extinction of languages. The best estimates place the number of languages in the world at around 6,000. About half of these will disappear over the course of the next century, which translates to 3,000 languages in just 1,200 months. Every two weeks or so, a language is thought to be disappearing from the planet.

 

Paragraph B

How are we aware? Linguists from all over the world have been compiling data for the past two or three decades. They draw the conclusion that a language will soon become extinct if there are only a few speakers left and no one is making an effort to teach the younger generations the language. And if there are fewer than 100 speakers of a language, we must come to the same conclusion. It won't probably continue for very long. Only 4% of the world's population speaks 97% of the languages, according to a 1999 survey.

 

Paragraph C

There is nothing that can be done to save many languages because there are either too few or too old speakers, and the community is too busy trying to survive to care about their language. However, not all languages face such dire circumstances. When languages are in grave danger of extinction, there are frequently steps that can be taken to save them. It's known as revitalization.

 

Paragraph D

When a community becomes aware that its language is in danger, it can begin to take steps to genuinely revitalize it. The community must aspire to maintain its language. Respect for minority languages must be shown by the culture it is a part of. Funding is required to support the teachers, materials, and courses. Additionally, linguists are required to complete the fundamental task of recording the language on paper. The most important thing is to record, analyze, and write down the language. If people are to survive in a society that is becoming more computer-literate, they must be able to read and write.

 

Paragraph E

Can we, however, save a few thousand languages in that manner? Yes, if there was the desire and the money. The hiring of linguists, the training of local analysts, the provision of teachers and language resources to the community, the compilation of grammar and dictionaries, and the creation of educational materials are not inexpensive. An endangered language needs to be revitalized over a long period of time. Although it is challenging to make generalizations due to the wide range of circumstances, $100,000 per language per year cannot be far from the truth. We would need to spend about $900 million if we put that much effort into learning each of the 3,000 languages over the course of three years.

 

Paragraph F

Famous cases serve as examples of what is possible. Welsh is the only Celtic language that has begun to show signs of real growth in addition to halting its steady decline toward extinction. Welsh is currently protected by two Language Acts, and it is becoming more prevalent throughout Wales.

 

Paragraph G

On the other side of the globe, a system of so-called "language nests," which were first implemented in 1982, has helped to preserve Maori in New Zealand. These are organizations that give young children under the age of five exposure to the language in a home environment. All of the employees are native Maori speakers from the neighborhood. After leaving the nests, it is hoped that the kids will continue to practice their Maori skills, and as they get older, they will serve as role models for a new generation of young kids. These kinds of situations occur frequently. Faroese, which is spoken in the Faroe Islands after the Islanders received some political autonomy from Denmark, is one example of a language that has grown significantly when it is associated with a degree of political autonomy.

 

Paragraph H

Romansch faced a challenging situation in Switzerland, where it is spoken in five distinct dialects and has dwindling numbers as young people leave their community for employment in German-speaking cities. The development of a single written language for all of these dialects in the 1980s provided the solution in this case. In some regions of Switzerland, Romansch Grischun, as it is now known, has official status. It is also being used more frequently in the spoken form on radio and television.

 

Paragraph I

A language can be saved from extinction by being revived. After many years of neglect and suppression, there were now only eight elderly fluent speakers of the Ainu language in Japan. However, fresh perspectives and a positive interest in survival were brought about by new government policies. Many "semi-speakers," or individuals who had stopped speaking Ainu due to the undesirable attitudes of Japanese speakers, were encouraged to start speaking again. The language is more widely accessible than it has been in years, and there is new interest in it.

 

Paragraph J

Even extinct languages can be revived with the right descriptions and resources. An illustration is the South Australian tribe Kaurna. Although it had been lost to history for about a century, this language was quite well documented. Therefore, when a significant movement for its revival emerged, it was possible to rebuild it. Naturally, the revised language differs from the original. It lacks much of the older vocabulary and the range of the original. However, it can still serve as a badge of modern identity for its inhabitants. And just like any other living language, it will expand its capabilities and its vocabulary as long as people continue to value it as a true indicator of their identity and are willing to continue using it.

 

Paragraph K

Though it is too soon to predict these revived languages' futures, in some parts of the world they are attracting precisely the types of supportive grassroots sentiments and attitudes that are necessary for language survival. We may observe slight increases in the overall number of languages in the world in such unexpected but heartwarming ways.

2.

Saving Language Reading Question & Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about Saving Language

Questions and Answers 1-3
  • Some of the elements required to support the revitalization of a language within a community are listed below.
  • Which THREE of the following factors does the text's author mention?
  • Write the appropriate letters A-G in boxes 1-3 on your answer sheet.

 

 

  1. assistance from the native population
  2. the existence of similar languages
  3. on-the-spot assistance from language experts
  4. a variety of speakers of various ages
  5. procedures for formal education
  6. a common reason for which the language is necessary.
  7. books tracing the language's historical development.

 

Saving Language Answers with Explanations (1-3)

 

Question Type: Multiple Choice (Selecting Multiple Answers).

 

In this type of question, you are asked to select more than one correct answer from a list of options. These questions test your ability to identify specific details and information within the passage.

 

How to best answer this question:

 

  • Read the list of factors provided.
  • Carefully read the passage to identify which of these factors the author mentions.
  • Write the letters corresponding to the correct factors in the answer boxes.

 

 

1. A

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph D 

The community must aspire to maintain its language. 

 

Explanation

The author points out that in order for any community to revive its native tongue, its native speakers must put forth effort in that particular community.


 

2. C

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph D 

Additionally, linguists are required to complete the fundamental task of recording the language on paper.

 

Explanation

Language experts must assist indigenous communities in preserving their language by recording, analysing, and writing it down.


 

3. E

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph E 

The hiring of linguists, the training of local analysts, the provision of teachers and language resources to the community, the compilation of grammar and dictionaries, and the creation of educational materials are not inexpensive. 

 

Explanation

The passage notes that revitalizing any language is a difficult process, but it is possible if formal education processes, such as writing school study materials in the targeted language, are targeted.

Questions and Answers 4-8
  • Match the languages A-F with the statements below (Questions 4-8) which describe how a language was saved.
  • Write your answers in boxes 4-8 on your answer sheet.

 

Languages:

 

  1. Welsh
  2. Maori
  3. Faroese
  4. Romansch
  5. Ainu
  6. Kaurna

 

4. The revival of the language was made possible by written samples of it.
5. There was a mix of different kinds of language.
6. Some parts of the population were given the chance to take part in language immersion programs.
7. People were told to think less negatively about the language.
8. The area where the language was spoken won its freedom.

 

Saving Language Reading Answers with Explanations (4-8)

 

Type of question: Matching Features

 

In this type of question, you are provided with a list of features or characteristics and asked to match them with the correct options from another list, which could include names, languages, places, etc. This requires you to understand specific details and connect them accurately based on the information given in the passage.

 

How to best answer:

 

  • Quickly skim the passage to get a general understanding of its content and structure.
  • Highlight or underline keywords in both the statements and the options. Keywords often include names, dates, specific terms, or unique phrases.
  • Use your skimming to locate the parts of the passage where the keywords are mentioned. 
  • Once you find the relevant sections, read those parts of the text carefully to understand the context and details that match the features you're looking for.
  • Compare the details in the passage with the statements. 
  • Be aware that the text might use synonyms or paraphrased versions of the keywords in the questions. 


 

4. F

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph J 

A language can be saved from extinction by being revived. After many years of neglect and suppression, there were now only eight elderly fluent speakers of the Ainu language in Japan.

 

Explanation

The passage says that a language can be brought back into existence if there are good records of it like there were for the Kaurna language.


 

5. D

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph H

The development of a single written language for all of these dialects in the 1980s provided the solution in this case.

 

Explanation

It is stated that there were five different dialects of Romansch in Switzerland. To solve this problem, all five dialects were unified in a similar language.



 

6. B

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph G

On the other side of the globe, a system of so-called 'language nests,' which were first implemented in 1982, has helped to preserve Maori in New Zealand.

 

Explanation

In order to preserve the Maori language, language nests are created as a part of language immersion programs in New Zealand. The goal is for the children to continue speaking the language and pass it on to future generations.


 

7. E

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph I

However, fresh perspectives and a positive interest in survival were brought about by new government policies.

 

Explanation

The passage discusses the significance of how the government encouraged those who were hesitant to speak Ainu, which helped the language to gain popularity.


 

8. C

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph G

Faroese, which is spoken in the Faroe Islands after the Islanders received some political autonomy from Denmark, is one example of a language that has grown significantly when it is associated with a degree of political autonomy.

 

Explanation

It is stated in the passage that the regions that attained freedom had a greater chance of preserving their native tongue, as was the case with the Faroese.

Questions and Answers 9-13
Do the following statements agree with the information given in the Reading Passage?
Based on your understanding of the passage, mark the statement:

  • YES if the statement agrees with the claims of the writer
  • NO if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer
  • NOT GIVEN if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

 

 

9.  When a small community's language is in danger, the most important thing to do is to save it.
10. Some parts of the world are more likely to lose their language than others.
11. For a language to survive, more than 100 people need to speak it.
12. In the 1990s, scientists started looking into why languages are dying out.
13. The rate that languages are dying out is getting faster.

 

Saving Language Reading Answers with Explanations (9-13)

 

Type of Question: "Yes/No/Not Given" 

 

These questions assess your ability to identify whether the given statements are true, false, or not mentioned based on the information provided in the passage.

 

How to best answer this question:

 

  • Understand exactly what the statement is asserting.
  • Look for relevant sections in the passage that discuss the topic mentioned in the statement.
  • Compare the information in the statement with the details in the passage to see if it:
  • Agrees with the writer's claims (YES)
  • Contradicts the writer's claims (NO)
  • Is not mentioned or there's no information about it (NOT GIVEN)
  • Make sure the chosen answer is supported by specific evidence or the lack thereof in the passage.

 

 

9. No

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph C

There is nothing that can be done to save many languages because there are either too few or too old speakers, and the community is too busy trying to survive to care about their language.
 

Explanation

This line indicates that in some cases, it is not possible to save a language when only a few people speak it, contradicting the statement that saving the language is the most important thing to do.


 

10. Not Given

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph 

NA
 

Explanation

The passage does not provide any information suggesting that some parts of the world are more likely to lose their language than others, hence the statement is not addressed.


 

11. Yes

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph B 

And if there are fewer than 100 speakers of a language, we must come to the same conclusion. It won't probably continue for very long.

 

Explanation

This line clearly states that a language is unlikely to survive if fewer than 100 people speak it, supporting the statement that more than 100 people need to speak a language for it to survive.


 

12. No

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph B

Linguists from all over the world have been compiling data for the past two or three decades.
 

Explanation

This line indicates that research into language extinction has been ongoing for the past two or three decades, not starting in the 1990s as the statement suggests, making the statement incorrect.


 

13. Yes

 

Reference:

 

Paragraph A

By the standards of the past, however, what is occurring right now is extraordinary. It represents the widespread extinction of languages.

 

Explanation

This line suggests that the current rate of language extinction is unprecedented and happening rapidly, supporting the statement that the rate at which languages are dying out is getting faster.

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FAQs

Q. How can I improve my comprehension skills for the IELTS Reading test?

Ans. To improve your comprehension skills, read regularly and practice skimming and scanning techniques. Focus on expanding your vocabulary and use context clues to understand new words. Regularly take practice tests to familiarize yourself with the test format and question types.

Q. What types of questions are there in the IELTS Reading section?

Ans. The IELTS Reading section includes various question types such as multiple choice, True/False/Not Given, matching headings, matching information, sentence completion, summary completion, and note completion. Familiarize yourself with these formats to improve your test-taking strategies.

Q. How can I manage my time effectively during the IELTS Reading test?

Ans. To manage time effectively, allocate about 20 minutes per passage. Skim the text for main ideas and scan for specific information when answering questions. Practice with timed reading tests to enhance your ability to complete the section within the 60-minute limit.