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The Triune Brain Reading Answers: IELTS Reading Practice

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Updated on Jul 02, 2024, 11:57

Planning to crack IELTS in 2024? Then, spice up your prep with The Triune Brain Reading Answers. This exciting topic and its dynamic exercises will help you learn how to ace the IELTS Reading test. 
 

The IELTS Reading test provides a couple of passages and asks you to answer the questions based on the given passage.

 

The nature of the passages, their number and question types vary between the IELTS Academic Reading test and the IELTS General Reading test. The Academic Reading test is made up of 3 long passages, which are taken from current books, journals, magazines and newspapers.

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1. The Triune Brain IELTS Reading Passage

Read the passage and answer Questions 1-13.

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2. The Triune Brain Questions and Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about The Triune Brain

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1.

The Triune Brain Reading Passage

General Information

  • Read Instructions: Understand each question before answering.
  • Manage Time: Spend about 20 minutes per passage.
  • Skim and Scan: Quickly get the main idea and find specific information.
  • Highlight Key Info: Underline essential words or phrases.
  • Answer All Questions: Attempt every question; no penalty for wrong answers.
  • Stay Focused: Avoid distractions and keep your attention on the task.
  • Check Spelling: Ensure correct spelling and grammar.
  • Transfer Answers Clearly: Write answers neatly on the answer sheet.
  • Don’t Dwell: Move on if stuck and return later.
  • Review: If time allows, review your answers.

 

 

 

 

The Triune Brain Reading Passage

 


 

Paragraph 1: Scientists have identified the reptilian cortex as the first of our three brain regions to evolve. This brain ensures that the body can do the most fundamental functions necessary for survival, like breathing, resting, and keeping the heart pumping. It is not necessary for us to "think" about these pursuits. The "startle centre," a system that allows us to respond quickly to sudden and unexpected events, is likewise located in the reptilian cortex. The reptilian cortex is responsible for your startled lurch when a door smashes elsewhere in the house and your heightened awareness when a twig cracks in a nearby bush on your evening stroll. The reptilian brain has only the most primitive impulses when it comes to social interaction, such as aggression, mating, and territorial defence. A crocodile protecting its territory along the river is not different to a turf fight between rival gangs in the city.
 

Paragraph 2: The lizard may be possessive of its territory, but it doesn't care one bit about the welfare of its offspring. It is evident that something new is happening when one hears the emergency call of a dolphin separated from its pod or when one sees elephants grieving for their dead. The limbic cortex has been recognised by scientists. The limbic cortex, found only in mammals, motivates animals to care for their young by flooding the parent with sensations of love and comfort while their young are in direct range. Mammals, like humans, are motivated to form bonds with others through emotional experiences. Our pleasant feelings of togetherness, unity, and comfort are amplified when we are with people of "our kind," whether at a soccer practice, a church service, a school assembly, or a bar. We become lonely and motivated to seek connection if we spend too much time apart from these networks.               
 

Paragraph 3: It is only in humans that these two cortexes are responsible and are able to scratch the surface of what is possible. We eat, sleep, and play like any other animal, but we also talk, scheme, reason, and argue over the finer details of morality. The neocortex, the expansive third brain responsible for reasoning, planning, and conceptualisation, is largely responsible for our special abilities. The neocortex's strength lies in its capacity to reflectively consider issues beyond the scope of the immediate situation. Although some mammals, like apes, can learn and remember basic lessons, only humans are capable of considering the "big picture" at the same time as acting on impulse. We can construct complex theories of physical or social phenomena by stringing together elementary insights (an apple falls from a tree; hurting others leads to unhappiness, etc.). (For example, gravitation laws and a concern for human rights).

 

Paragraph 4: When strung together, these decisions can add up to achievements that cannot be matched by any other animal. When a student knows that getting enough sleep will help them perform better on an exam the next day, it can be easier to overcome the limbic system's natural instinct to keep them up late socialising. This unending dedication over three years will yield a first-class degree and funding for further education; over a lifetime, it could lead to significant advancements in our understanding of the world and its inhabitants. The neocortex is responsible for our ability to delay gratification now in exchange for greater rewards later. 
 

Paragraph 5: The complexity of brain damage and mental disorders can be better understood with a triune brain in mind. For instance, brain death is widely recognised as the most severe form of brain damage. The person may appear to be merely unconscious, perhaps sleeping, but this is a deceptive appearance. In this case, the reptilian brain is operating automatically despite the unrecoverable breakdown of other cortexes.

 

Paragraph 6: It's important to note that the limbic cortex registers disturbances in a different way. Pups with brain injuries to the limbic system are able to get around and take care of themselves nutritionally, but they are unaware of their littermates' presence. According to the scientists, "one impaired monkey stepped on his outraged peers as if treading on a log or a rock" after undergoing a limbic lobotomy. In humans, damage to the limbic system is linked to sociopathic behaviour. Full-neocortex sociopaths are typically shrewd and emotionally intelligent as the average person, but they have severe difficulties forming meaningful connections with others and showing compassion.
 

Paragraph 7: A metal rod skewered railway worker Phineas Gage's skull, removing a significant portion of his neocortex, and yet he survived the injury. Gage's coworkers noticed a change in his equilibrium, even though he continued to live and work as before. Even as his intellectual abilities declined, Gage's animal tendencies became more pronounced, and he began making increasingly crude jokes. Nonetheless, recent research suggests that Gage was able to smooth out these distressing transitions and rediscover acceptable social behaviour over time. This suggests that patients with severe brain injuries may benefit from reparative therapy in order to improve their quality of life.

 

Quick Tip:

On completion, compare and analyse your answers with the help of the answer key. You can use the reference provided to locate the answers within the passage.

The detailed explanations for each answer will help you understand how answers are framed.

 

Read More: All About IELTS Reading Test 

2.

The Triune Brain Questions and Answers

Discover exciting and informative IELTS reading answers about The Triune Brain

Questions and Answers 1-5
Classify the following as typical of:
  • A. the reptilian cortex
  • B. the limbic cortex
  • C. the neocortex

 

Write the correct letter, A, B or C, on your answer sheet in boxes 1-5 
 

  1. Giving up happiness in the short term for gains in the long run.
  2. Maintaining the functions of the body that are necessary for life.
  3. To feel the pain of losing someone.
  4. Putting together groups and communities.
  5. Making a choice and sticking to it.

 

Also Read: IELTS Reading Resources

 

The Triune Brain Answers with Explanation 1-5

 

Question Type: Matching Feature
 

IELTS Reading tasks comprise various questions that ask you to match certain information with others. This includes Matching Headings, Matching Features, Matching Sentence Endings and Matching Information. The only difference between these tasks is the nature of the information they are matched to. 
 

In the Matching Feature Task, you will be given a set of statements and a set of features. The statements are information from the text that must be matched with the features. The features are picked from the passage and are represented by alphabets.  
 

The Matching Feature question type analyses your ability to recognise the text's facts, opinions, and theories. It tests your capacity to scan for specific information. It also assesses your capability to compare and contrast the ideas. 
 

How to Answer Matching Feature Task: 
 

  • Read the given statements and features 
  • Underline the keywords (the features are most probably your keywords here)
  • Skim through the passage for the feature/keyword
  • Verify the context by reading the paragraph containing the feature/keyword
  • Finalise the information by matching it with the given statement
     

Now check out the answers below: 


 

1. C

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 4: The neocortex is responsible for our ability to delay gratification now in exchange for greater rewards later.  
 

Explanation: The given passage explains the function of the brain. According to the above-given information, the neocortex region of the human brain makes insightful decisions. So, it is evident from the passage that this region allows us to make decisions such as giving up happiness in the short term for gains in the long run.


 

2. A

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 1: Scientists have identified the reptilian cortex as the first of our three brain regions to evolve. This brain ensures that the body can do the most fundamental functions necessary for survival, like breathing, resting, and keeping the heart pumping.

 

Explanation: The passage begins by explaining the properties of the reptilian cortex of the brain. According to the above-mentioned paragraph, the reptilian cortex maintains the functions of the body that are necessary for life.


 

3. B

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 2: The limbic cortex has been recognised by scientists. The limbic cortex, found only in mammals, motivates animals to care for their young by flooding the parent with sensations of love and comfort while their young are in direct range. 
 

Explanation: According to the passage, the limbic cortex allows animals to form emotional bonds and connect with species of their kind. So, it is evident from the passage that the limbic cortex allows creatures to feel the pain of losing someone.


 

4. B

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 2:  The limbic cortex, found only in mammals, motivates animals to care for their young by flooding the parent with sensations of love and comfort while their young are in direct range. Mammals, like humans, are motivated to form bonds with others through emotional experiences. Our pleasant feelings of togetherness, unity, and comfort are amplified when we are with people of "our kind," whether at a soccer practice, a church service, a school assembly, or a bar. We become lonely and motivated to seek connection if we spend too much time apart from these networks.              
 

Explanation: According to the passage, the functions of the limbic cortex enable animals to form bonds through emotional experiences. It cultivates feelings of togetherness and unity. The limbic cortex works in putting together groups and communities.


 

5. C

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 4:  When a student knows that getting enough sleep will help them perform better on an exam the next day, it can be easier to overcome the limbic system's natural instinct to keep them up late socialising. This unending dedication over three years will yield a first-class degree and funding for further education; over a lifetime, it could lead to significant advancements in our understanding of the world and its inhabitants. The neocortex is responsible for our ability to delay gratification now in exchange for greater rewards later. 

 

Explanation: According to the passage, the neocortex region of the human brain enables us to make decisions and to stick to them. It analyses the longer-term consequences of a decision and facilitates us to do that. So, it is possible to say that the neocortex helps make a choice and stick to it.
 

Get an Overview: IELTS Modules 

Questions and Answers 6-9
  • Complete the summary below.
  • For each response, choose NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER from the passage.

 

The 6.  _____________excels in looking at the big picture and thinking about things that might not be immediately relevant. Other species, like 7.______________, have a somewhat good memory and can acquire new information, but only humans can think strategically while also acting on 8. ___________. Simple observations (an apple falls from a tree; injuring others causes suffering) can be strung together to form more 9. ____________  of physical or social phenomena (such as the laws of gravity and a concern for human rights).


 

Note:

Do not get confused between the Sentence Completion and Summary Completion tasks. While Sentence Completion asks you to complete the incomplete sentences, the Summary Completion task asks you to complete the incomplete summary of the given passage.

 

Also Read: IELTS Practice Questions with Answers

 

The Triune Brain Answers with Explanation 6-9

 

Question Type: Summary Completion 
 

In the Summary Completion Task, you will receive an incomplete passage summary. The summary can be in the form of a paragraph, note, or table. You must complete the summary by reading and analysing the given passage. 

 

The Summary Completion Task evaluates your aptitude for grasping the central concept of a text and understanding the supporting details. It assesses your linguistic proficiency in determining the correct grammatical structure when completing sentences (for instance, whether a noun or verb or an adjective or an adverb is needed). 
 

How to Answer Sentence Completion Task:

 

  • Read the passage completely to understand its summary
  • Now go through the incomplete summary given in the question
  • Scan the passage and locate where the information is mentioned
  • Read the part and find appropriate words to fill the blanks

 

Now check out the answers below: 


 

6. Neocortex

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 3: The neocortex's strength lies in its capacity to reflectively consider issues beyond the scope of the immediate situation. Although some mammals, like apes, can learn and remember basic lessons, only humans are capable of considering the "big picture" at the same time as acting on impulse. We can construct complex theories of physical or social phenomena by stringing together elementary insights (an apple falls from a tree; hurting others leads to unhappiness, etc.). (For example, gravitation laws and a concern for human rights).
 

Explanation: According to the passage, the neocortex enables humans to see and conceptualise matters on a larger scale. Instead of gratifying momentary pleasures, human intelligence enables us to consider the consequences of our actions. So, it is clear from the given lines that the neocortex enables us to excel in looking at the big picture and thinking about things that might not be immediately relevant. 


 

7. Apes

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 3: The neocortex's strength lies in its capacity to reflectively consider issues beyond the scope of the immediate situation. Although some mammals, like apes, can learn and remember basic lessons, only humans are capable of considering the "big picture" at the same time as acting on impulse. 
 

Explanation: The above lines denote that apes can also learn and memorise new things. However, these are merely impulsive actions. On the other hand, humans can act impulsively while at the same time being capable of considering the long-term effects of the action. 


 

8. Impulse

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 3: The neocortex's strength lies in its capacity to reflectively consider issues beyond the scope of the immediate situation. Although some mammals, like apes, can learn and remember basic lessons, only humans are capable of considering the "big picture" at the same time as acting on impulse. 
 

Explanation: According to the passage, the human brain is not only capable of acting on impulses, like apes. They can also make decisions considering the long-term benefits of an action. 


 

9. Elementary Insights

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 3: We can construct complex theories of physical or social phenomena by stringing together elementary insights (an apple falls from a tree; hurting others leads to unhappiness, etc.). (For example, gravitation laws and a concern for human rights).
 

Explanation: As mentioned above, the human brain's neocortex enables us to see and reflect on everyday matters. Even a simple and mundane observation can lead to broader and greater thoughts. We tend to form bigger ideas and theories by connecting our elementary insights or thoughts. 


Learn More: All About IELTS!

Questions and Answers 10-13
Complete the blanks below.

  • For each answer, write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS from the passage.
  • Write your answers on your answer sheet in boxes 10–13.

 

10. A person who only has a reptilian cortex that functions is called_______________.

 

11. ____________ in humans is associated with disorders in the limbic system.

 

12. Phineas Gage lost part of his ____________  because of an accident in the Industry. 

 

13. After his accident, Gage's coworkers noticed a difference between __________ and how he thought. 


 

Pro Tip:

An easy way to crack the Sentence Completion task is to find the right keyword. Instead of rereading the entire passage, find the keyword in the question and scan through the passage to locate it. The answer is likely to be in and around the keyword.

 

Check Out: IELTS Reading Tips & Tricks 2024

 

The Triune Brain Answers with Explanation 10-13

 

Question Type: Sentence Completion 

 

The Sentence Completion tasks are easier than summary completion tasks. Here, you can scan the passage and easily find your answers. 
 

In the Sentence Completion task, you will be given a paragraph with incomplete sentences. You can find appropriate words from the passage to fill in the blanks and form meaningful sentences. 

 

How to Answer Sentence Completion Task:
 

  • Read the given sentences first.
  • Scan the given passage and locate where the information given in the (question) sentence is mentioned.
  • Look out for keywords or their synonyms (sometimes the information will be paraphrased)
  • Read the part and find appropriate words to fill in the blanks.

 

Now check out the answers below: 
 

10. Brain Dead

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 5:  For instance, brain death is widely recognised as the most severe form of brain damage. The person may appear to be merely unconscious, perhaps sleeping, but this is a deceptive appearance. In this case, the reptilian brain is operating automatically despite the unrecoverable breakdown of other cortexes. 
 

Explanation: The above-mentioned lines directly imply that when a person's brain gets damaged and only the reptilian cortex functions, the condition is called brain death. Although the person might appear to be sleeping, the other two brain regions will be irreversibly damaged. 


 

11. Sociopathic Behaviour

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 6:  In humans, damage to the limbic system is linked to sociopathic behaviour. 
 

Explanation: According to the passage, sociopathic behaviours are linked with anomalies in the limbic system. Unlike other regions of the human brain, the limbic cortex registers damage differently. 


 

12. Neocortex

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 7: A metal rod skewered railway worker Phineas Gage's skull, removing a significant portion of his neocortex, and yet he survived the injury. 


Explanation: The final paragraph of the passage explains the consequences of neocortex damage in human beings. The example given in the passage is the case of a railway worker, Phineas Gage. So, it is clear from the text that the worker's neocortex region got damaged.

 

13. Animal Tendencies

 

Reference:

 

From paragraph 7: Even as his intellectual abilities declined, Gage's animal tendencies became more pronounced, and he began making increasingly crude jokes. 
 

Explanation: As the passage explains, the accident caused severe damage to Gage’s neocortex brain. After the incident, his coworkers noticed a difference in his intellectual abilities and desires. While his thought process became more subtle, his desires or animal tendencies became more obscure and sharp. 

 

Start your IELTS preparation as early as possible. Draft a timetable and stick to your plan consistently. Getting expert help for your IELTS journey can make it more exciting and easier. 

 

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FAQs

Q. How can I improve my reading skills?

A. Improving your reading skills is best achieved by establishing a regular reading routine. Read diverse genres such as daily newspapers, entertainment magazines, novels, and academic texts. Find new words and explore their meaning and usage. Try to use them in your speaking and writing.

Q. What is the minimum preparation time for the IELTS Reading test?

A. The recommended preparation time for the IELTS test is generally 2-3 months. Within this period, allocate 15-20 days specifically for your IELTS Reading test preparation. Note that the essential preparation time is different for each individual. It can vary based on factors such as your current proficiency, daily time availability, and concentration level. Tailor your preparation plan, considering all the influencing factors.

Q. How can I book my IELTS exam?

A. You can book your slots either online or offline. You can visit the official website for IDP IELTS India to book your IELTS slot online. Alternatively, for offline booking, you can visit the nearest IDP branch, the IDP Head Office in New Delhi, or rely on any referral partners. In addition to the IELTS, there are numerous other requirements you need to fulfil to study/work in a foreign country.

Q. Can I get free IELTS Reading resources online?

A. Yes,  you can get free IELTS Reading resources online. While numerous online sites offer IELTS materials and classes, they rely on official pages more. Visit the official website of IDP or the British Council for sample papers. Leap also offer top IELTS resources, practice sessions, and mock tests to help you prepare.

Q. What are some good IELTS books to study grammar?

Some of the good suggestions to improve your grammar are:

  • Cambridge Grammar for IELTS
  • Oxford Practice Grammar Advanced, G.Yule (Oxford)
  • IELTS Topic Vocabulary: Essential Vocabulary for Speaking and Writing Exams by Peter Killingley and Mary E. Kuder
  • English Grammar in Use Book with Answers, R. Murphy (Cambridge).
Q. In what order will I take my IELTS test?

A. The order of your IELTS test depends on your test mode. In a computer-based IELTS test, the order is Listening, Reading, and Writing, with the Speaking test scheduled separately before or after the other sections. On the other hand, in a paper-delivered IELTS, the order is Writing, Reading, and Listening. Depending on the test centre, the Speaking test may occur on the same day or within a range of 7 days before or after the test date.

Q. How early should I book my IELTS test?

A. It is advisable to book your IELTS slot 2-3 months before your desired test date. This will help you get the test date and centre you prefer because the test slots in popular cities get filled faster. The latest you can book your IELTS slot is one week before the actual test date.

Q. What is the minimum score to pass IELTS?

A. There is no specific passing or failing cut-off for IELTS, as the required score varies for each university or institution. However, the average score falls within the range of 5.5 to 6.5. The minimum IELTS score required to study abroad can vary depending on your university and the program you are applying for. 

Q. Can I score 7 on my first attempt at the IELTS Reading test?

A. Yes, scoring 7 or above on your first attempt is possible. However, achieving a high score on your initial attempt requires thorough preparation and practice. Creating a well-structured plan and engaging in consistent practice is crucial to aim for a high band score on your first try. You can contact Leap’s IELTS experts for proper guidance and study materials.

Q. How long are my IELTS Reading scores valid?

A. IELTS scores are generally valid for two years from your test date. The validity period is to ensure that your knowledge is intact. A higher validity period can affect your knowledge since you might forget things with time. Although your test scores have a strict validity period, check with your university if the validity is negotiable. You must not retake the test if your university accepts an expired certificate. 

Q. Can I retake my IELTS Reading test alone to improve my band score?

A. Yes, you can retake the IELTS Reading test alone to improve your band score. The new ‘one-skill retake’ facility allows you to take just one module of the IELTS test. Since the scores from all four IELTS exam modules influence your overall score, the one-skill retake policy will help students maintain better scores.

Q. When are IELTS results released?

A. The IELTS test results vary based on your test format:

  • The paper-based test results are typically available 13 days after the exam.
  • In the case of the computer-based test, results are usually available  3-5 days after the test date.
  • Results for IELTS for UKVI can be expected 13 days after the test date.
  • IELTS for Life Skills results are generally released within 7 days after the test date.